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12/29/2017
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China Shuts Down 13,000 Websites for Breaking Internet Laws

The government says its rules are to protect security and stability, but some say they are repressive.

The Chinese government has shut down more than 13,000 websites for breaking Internet laws, reports Xinhua, China's state-run news agency. These rules and regulations have governed the country's networks since 2015.

On top of this, 2,200 sites have been called into talks with the Cyberspace Administration of China. Such actions "have a powerful deterrent effect," says Wang Shengjun, deputy chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, in Xinhua's report.

China claims its regulations protect national security and stability. Human rights groups feel its harsh Internet laws are repressive, created to block dissent. In its "Freedom on the Net 2017" report, Freedom House called China "the world's worst abuser of Internet freedom."

The country, which has more than 731 million people online, has banned thousands of websites, including popular foreign sites Facebook, Google, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Social media is highly regulated. China limits its citizens to local social platforms Weibo and WeChat.

Despite its restrictive Internet laws, China's government says it wants to collaborate with other nations as global Internet access continues to grow. Earlier this month, President Xi Jinping told tech industry leaders to "respect cyberspace sovereignty" and said the country will become a partner in establishing a "common future" online as the world becomes increasingly connected.

While China is an extreme example, it's not the only country ramping up efforts to limit illicit content and propaganda online. A new law in Germany, for example, imposes fines on social media companies for neglecting to remove posts with hate speech. Social firms have pushed back, saying rules could cause unnecessary censorship.

Read more details here.

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Gorilla Hunter
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Gorilla Hunter,
User Rank: Strategist
1/2/2018 | 9:37:02 AM
Re: Global Internet Bill of Rights
In China, you can be executed for certain speech. In the US, you can advocate a state succeeding from the US, see CalExit. In China, you even suggest succeeding, you will end up with a bullet in the head from the state. Ryan also misses that you cannot restrict "dangerous" sites without it spiraling out of control. What is dangerous to some is not to others.  Free speech is an all or nothing deal. Also, who would police these international tenets? The UN? That group is a huge failure. They only outlawed  terrorism after 9/11, they failed with nuclear non-proliferation, they did nothing when the civil war in Sri Lanka went in their "safe zones" and almost 7,000 civilians were brutally murdered, the UN child abuse sex scandal, turned a blind eye to the Serbrenica Genocide, called the Khmer Rouge the true government in Cambodia after they killed 33% of their population, and many more. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2017 | 10:01:10 PM
Re: Global Internet Bill of Rights
It will never happen. US values are completely antithetical to even EU values, let alone Chinese and other values. For instance, US free speech rights are completely counter to the regulatory levels European nations go to with rights to privacy and the criminalization of hate speech. And that's to say nothing of regimes we actually commonly consider repressive or oppressive.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
12/30/2017 | 12:30:11 PM
Global Internet Bill of Rights
There needs to be an international set of tenets that each country attests to following. Through these agreed upon set of rules, you could help in the effort of restricting dangerous sites while not causing a deterrence towards freedom of expression. 
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