Endpoint

2/21/2018
09:01 AM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

C-Suite Divided Over Security Concerns

Survey shows 60% of CEOs plan to invest the most resources in malware prevention, but CISOs, CIOs, and CTOs are on a different page.

More than 60% of CEOs believe malware is the biggest threat to their organization, but just one-third of CISOs, CIOs, and CTOs agree. 

It's just one data point in a new study by identity management company Centrify that shows a major disconnect on this and many other security issues between CEOs and their technical officers (TOs), which include CIOs, CTOs and CISOs. 

CEOs and TOs also diverged on whether they knew if their organization had experienced a breach. Only 55% of CEOs say their organization experienced a breach, while 79% of TOs say so. On the technology front, 62% of CEOs say two-factor authentication technologies are difficult to manage, while only 41% of TOs concur with that statement. 

"Part of the problem is that the technical people tend to try to keep the breach quiet," says Tom Kemp, CEO at Centrify. "I think overall, the TOs need to do a better job managing up, because with SEC regulations and various state breach notification regulations, organizations really do have to report if they have been breached today."

Kemp points out that 42% of TOs point to identity breaches as one of the primary threats to their organizations. And 68% of executives whose companies experienced significant breaches indicate it would most likely have been prevented by either privileged user identity and access management or user identity assurance. Only 8% of all executives whose companies experienced a significant breach say that anti-malware technology would have prevented the more significant breaches with serious consequences.

Frank Dickson, an IDC analyst who focuses on identity and access management, points out that the 2017 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report found that 81% of hacking-related breaches leveraged stolen and/or weak passwords.

"Our goal is not to eliminate malware, our goal is to eliminate breaches," Dickson says. "By strengthening authentication, it lets us build security into the network," and potentially eliminate the vast majority of breaches.

Lawrence Orans, a research vice president at Gartner who focuses on network security, says he doesn't think it's helpful to set security up as a choice between identity management versus malware detection.

"For example, malware could be used to steal credentials and execute an even broader attack," he says. "And it actually makes sense that there would be a disconnect between the CEO's understanding of new security technologies versus the TO's: that's what the CEO has the technical people for in the first place."

Centrify's Kemp maintains that TOs need to educate their CEOs on identity management issues, citing the three main tenets of so-called zero trust security:

  • Verify users. Companies can do this with single sign-on software that's layered in with two-factor authentication.
  • Validate devices. Have a procedure for determining if the devices are enrolled with the IT department with the right OS versions, patch levels, and antivirus software. IT must also check past usage, including a user's geography. (A user can't be in New York one minute, then San Jose five minutes later).
  • Limit access and privileges. Companies should move to a least-privilege model in which users only gain access to a system if they need it for their jobs, and only for a defined time period.

The study was based on a survey of 800 senior executives conducted in November 2017 by Dow Jones Customer Intelligence, a unit of the Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones Advertising Department. More than 75% of the executives surveyed are CEOs, CTOs or technical officers such as CIOs, CTOs and CISOs; the rest are their direct reports.

Related Content:

 

Black Hat Asia returns to Singapore with hands-on technical Trainings, cutting-edge Briefings, Arsenal open-source tool demonstrations, top-tier solutions and service providers in the Business Hall. Click for information on the conference and to register.

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Higher Education: 15 Books to Help Cybersecurity Pros Be Better
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/12/2018
Worst Password Blunders of 2018 Hit Organizations East and West
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/12/2018
2019 Attacker Playbook
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer, Dark Reading,  12/14/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
[Sponsored Content] The State of Encryption and How to Improve It
[Sponsored Content] The State of Encryption and How to Improve It
Encryption and access controls are considered to be the ultimate safeguards to ensure the security and confidentiality of data, which is why they're mandated in so many compliance and regulatory standards. While the cybersecurity market boasts a wide variety of encryption technologies, many data breaches reveal that sensitive and personal data has often been left unencrypted and, therefore, vulnerable.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-19790
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
An open redirect was discovered in Symfony 2.7.x before 2.7.50, 2.8.x before 2.8.49, 3.x before 3.4.20, 4.0.x before 4.0.15, 4.1.x before 4.1.9 and 4.2.x before 4.2.1. By using backslashes in the `_failure_path` input field of login forms, an attacker can work around the redirection target restricti...
CVE-2018-19829
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
Artica Integria IMS 5.0.83 has CSRF in godmode/usuarios/lista_usuarios, resulting in the ability to delete an arbitrary user when the ID number is known.
CVE-2018-16884
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
A flaw was found in the Linux kernel in the NFS41+ subsystem. NFS41+ shares mounted in different network namespaces at the same time can make bc_svc_process() use wrong back-channel id and cause a use-after-free. Thus a malicious container user can cause a host kernel memory corruption and a system ...
CVE-2018-17777
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
An issue was discovered on D-Link DVA-5592 A1_WI_20180823 devices. If the PIN of the page "/ui/cbpc/login" is the default Parental Control PIN (0000), it is possible to bypass the login form by editing the path of the cookie "sid" generated by the page. The attacker will have acc...
CVE-2018-18921
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
PHP Server Monitor before 3.3.2 has CSRF, as demonstrated by a Delete action.