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Authentication

5/28/2019
12:00 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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8 Ways to Authenticate Without Passwords

Passwordless authentication has a shot at becoming more ubiquitous in the next few years. We take a look at where things stand at the moment.
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HYPR

George Avetisov, CEO and co-founder of HYPR, has been on a mission for some time now. He aims to help people understand that moving away from the 'shared secret' of a password must be replaced by a system where the user's device holds a private key that can get authenticated by either touch, a thumbprint, or facial recognition.

'We look to eliminate shared secrets,' says Avetisov, who adds that in deploying HYPR, security teams can give their users a choice of how they want to authenticate.

'People don't want to be forced,' he says. 'For example, we ran a study in Australia and found that people didn't like eye recognition, where in Europe and the United States, they found it more acceptable.'  HYPR customer Mastercard, Avetisov added, gives its users a choice of a fingerprint, facial recognition, and a PIN.  

Image Source: HYPR

HYPR

George Avetisov, CEO and co-founder of HYPR, has been on a mission for some time now. He aims to help people understand that moving away from the "shared secret" of a password must be replaced by a system where the user's device holds a private key that can get authenticated by either touch, a thumbprint, or facial recognition.

"We look to eliminate shared secrets," says Avetisov, who adds that in deploying HYPR, security teams can give their users a choice of how they want to authenticate.

"People don't want to be forced, he says. "For example, we ran a study in Australia and found that people didn't like eye recognition, where in Europe and the United States, they found it more acceptable." HYPR customer Mastercard, Avetisov added, gives its users a choice of a fingerprint, facial recognition, and a PIN.

Image Source: HYPR

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ScottyTheMenace
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ScottyTheMenace,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/6/2019 | 5:46:08 PM
Touch ID is not passwordless
Not sure if it was your intent to suggest that it was, but Apple's Touch ID is not passwordless.

In iOS, you still have to set a passcode, and it seems to be the passcode that actually unlocks your device. All Touch ID does is use your fingerprint to fill the passcode into the field. (I don't know the technical details to know that's the case, but it sure seems like that's what's happening.) You're also forced to use the passcode seemingly at random (though it's probably time delimited) and to activate Touch ID after a restart.

I love using Touch ID—it's quite convenient—but its dependence on a typed passcode actually encourages users to use weak passcodes that are easily remembered since they'll eventually need to type it in, and typing the passcode* 984ELBMYAq[[email protected]%t5sM+5{j=9AYH__4jqDr on a touch keyboard is not real fun.

 

* Generated just now. Not any of my passwords. C'mon now, do I look that dumb? DON'T ANSWER THAT!
wibblewibble
100%
0%
wibblewibble,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/30/2019 | 7:49:18 AM
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