Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint //

Authentication

1/23/2017
03:00 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

'123456' Leads The Worst Passwords Of 2016

New report analyzes trends in more than 5 million passwords stolen from enterprises and leaked to the public last year.

It may be a ho-hum fact for many longtime security practitioners, but it nevertheless remains a fact that most users' password hygiene stinks. And since the needle on this matter moves about as much as a speedometer needle on an engineless car, the topic clearly bears revisiting. This time the reexamination of poorly chosen password comes by a recent report by SplashData on the worst passwords of 2016.

The team at SplashData took a look a look at more than five million passwords that were stolen from enterprises and leaked to the public last year to get a feel for the types of authentication secrets people use in real world. The results aren't pretty. According to the firm, the most common passwords are also ridiculously insecure - both from a prevalence and ease of guessing standpoint.

Tops on the list was "123456," which makes up about 4% of the sample set, followed closely by "password." In its entirety, the list shows that users continue to favor simplicity and convenience over security of their accounts:

  • 123456
  • password
  • 12345
  • 12345678
  • football
  • qwerty
  • 1234567890
  • 1234567
  • princess
  • 1234
  • login
  • welcome
  • solo
  • abc123
  • admin
  • 121212
  • flower
  • passw0rd
  • dragon
  • sunshine
  • master
  • hottie
  • loveme
  • zaq1zaq1
  • password1

 

Also troubling is that the list is littered with many more trivial variations of the top two offenders, with six sequential number variations and three variations of "password."

"Making minor modifications to an easily guessable password does not make it secure, and hackers will take advantage of these tendencies," says Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData, Inc.

In fact, 2016 also offered up the perfect anecdotal evidence to show the dangers of crummy passwords: the Democratic National Committee (DNC) hack was laid partially at the feet of a negligently chosen password. WikiLeaks' Julian Assange claims that John Podesta, chairperson of Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, used a "password" variant for one of his systems, and other reports show that Podesta used a slightly more sophisticated but still easily hacked "Runner4567" for several others. 

It was that second gaffe that allowed attackers to take over multiple online accounts in a fell swoop, and which illustrate the fact that choosing a quality password is just one part of password hygiene.

In a recent interview, Facebook CSO Alex Stamos claims password reuse is one of the biggest online dangers to user accounts.

"The biggest security risk to individuals is the reuse of passwords, if we look at the statistics of the people who have actually been harmed online. Even when you look at the advanced attacks that get a lot of thought in the security industry, these usually start with phishing or reused passwords," he said in an interview with TechCity.

In fact, a report out last week from Shape Security reports that reused passwords are fueling a credential-stuffing hacking bonanza online today. The firm released a report that showed 90% of today's enterprise login traffic comes from attackers automatically trying passwords stolen from one site in login screens at other sites in order to takeover accounts.

Shape reports that they're successful about 2% of the time--a very lucrative rate when they play the numbers game with millions of stolen credentials stuffed across hundreds of sites online.

Related Content:

 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
GavinD077
50%
50%
GavinD077,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2017 | 3:52:17 PM
Time is called Ladies & Gents
Okay, it is time to publicly admit that PASSWORDS are not working as a method of authentication. It doesn't matter how many times you flog a dead horse, it isn't go to get up and run the golden mile and let you win big - the same goes for passwords folks. So, where to next??? We are overdue a replacement for passwords that will be end user friendly and simple. Let's face it people, we humans are inherently lazy. Ideas people......
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/24/2017 | 8:22:15 AM
Meanwhile, to us security-sensitive...
Somebody I know once purposely changed a relatively secure password of theirs to one of the passwords on this list, in front of me, simply to annoy me because of how password-paranoid I am.

The password wasn't guarding anything particularly sensitive, but still.  It was like fingernails on a chalkboard.

(At least they eventually changed it back to something non-idiotic.)
JulietteRizkallah
50%
50%
JulietteRizkallah,
User Rank: Ninja
1/26/2017 | 6:04:30 PM
Counter user laziness with passowrd management
What a shocker! Users are lazy and use convenient and easy to memorize passwords. Corporations, for which protecting sensitive data is vital, password management solutions that would enforce a combination of alphanumerical, symbol and Caps letters would be a first step. identity governance and user behavior are a must.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2017 | 1:14:03 PM
Re: Counter user laziness with passowrd management
> convenient and easy to memorize passwords.

> enforce a combination of alphanumerical, symbol and Caps letters would be a first step

You see the problem here, right?  ;)
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/17/2020
Cybersecurity Bounces Back, but Talent Still Absent
Simone Petrella, Chief Executive Officer, CyberVista,  9/16/2020
Meet the Computer Scientist Who Helped Push for Paper Ballots
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/16/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-14180
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Affected versions of Atlassian Jira Service Desk Server and Data Center allow remote attackers authenticated as a non-administrator user to view Project Request-Types and Descriptions, via an Information Disclosure vulnerability in the editform request-type-fields resource. The affected versions are...
CVE-2020-14177
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Affected versions of Atlassian Jira Server and Data Center allow remote attackers to impact the application's availability via a Regex-based Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerability in JQL version searching. The affected versions are before version 7.13.16; from version 7.14.0 before 8.5.7; from versio...
CVE-2020-14179
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Affected versions of Atlassian Jira Server and Data Center allow remote, unauthenticated attackers to view custom field names and custom SLA names via an Information Disclosure vulnerability in the /secure/QueryComponent!Default.jspa endpoint. The affected versions are before version 8.5.8, and from...
CVE-2020-25789
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-19
An issue was discovered in Tiny Tiny RSS (aka tt-rss) before 2020-09-16. The cached_url feature mishandles JavaScript inside an SVG document.
CVE-2020-25790
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-19
** DISPUTED ** Typesetter CMS 5.x through 5.1 allows admins to upload and execute arbitrary PHP code via a .php file inside a ZIP archive. NOTE: the vendor disputes the significance of this report because "admins are considered trustworthy"; however, the behavior "contradicts our secu...