Endpoint

5/10/2018
11:30 AM
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As Personal Encryption Rises, So Do Backdoor Concerns

Geopolitical changes drive personal encryption among security pros, who are increasingly worried about encryption backdoors.

More security pros are embracing personal encryption in response to recent political changes, according to a new Venafi report. At the same time, they're increasingly wary of encryption backdoors as attackers become more sophisticated.

Researchers collected their data at the 2018 RSA Conference, where they polled more than 500 attendees on their response to geopolitical changes. Sixty-four percent of respondents said their personal encryption usage had increased as a result, compared with 45% at RSAC 2017.

Results also indicated a growing wariness of encryption backdoors. The majority (84%) of participants are more worried about backdoors in 2018, compared with 73% who expressed this concern last year. Over the past 12 months, the report notes, there have been many comments and legislative suggestions proposing mandated encryption backdoors.

Read more details here.

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Lital Asher-Dotan
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Lital Asher-Dotan,
User Rank: Author
5/10/2018 | 1:18:38 PM
Is this concern backed up with real incident data?
I wonder if we see an increasing trend of backdoors. 
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