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7/16/2020
06:50 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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8 Signs of a Smartphone Hack

A rapidly dwindling battery life or sudden spike in data usage could indicate your iOS or Android device has been compromised.
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The more we depend on smartphones, the more attractive an attack vector they become. Android and iOS and devices have become common targets for cybercriminals, as people use them for work, communications, social media, travel, and important services like finance and healthcare.

"From an attack perspective … there's a lot of different ways malware gets onto a mobile device," says Adam Meyers, vice president of intelligence at CrowdStrike, who says the company has seen "every manner of actor" going after smartphones.

Cybercriminals use a wide variety of mobile malware families, which CrowdStrike breaks down into five categories: remote access tools (RATs), which are the most comprehensive threat to mobile devices, along with banking Trojans, mobile ransomware, cryptomining malware, and advertising click fraud.  

One of the most common ways attackers get malware onto smartphones is via backdoored app stores and mobile apps, which has become "a very prevalent threat vector," Meyers says. In other cases, attackers try to convince users to download apps by sending phishing texts or emails that link to APK files hosted on attacker-controlled websites. Meanwhile, more targeted attacks may try to compromise a legitimate website to host a malicious application, adding a layer of legitimacy and possibly proving more successful if attackers knows their victims' browsing habits.

Some attackers fly under the radar; others leave clues behind. In some cases, your phone may be giving you hints it has been compromised. Here, mobile security experts share the red flags that may point to suspicious activity. Did we miss any? Feel free share them in the Comments section, below.

 

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio
 

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ksreiter
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ksreiter,
User Rank: Strategist
7/17/2020 | 1:38:32 PM
tl;dr version
For those of us that still think articles can be written in full on a single page, rather than having to click through multiple pages, here's the tl;dr version:

1. Sudden Loss of Battery Life
2. Excessive App Permissions
3. Your Account Is Sending Messages, But You Aren't
4. Suspicious Texts and Unknown Websites
5. Spike in Data Usage
6. Key Passwords No Longer Work
7. Not All Attackers Leave a Trace (Use a private VPN)
8. Don't reuse passwords, use antimalware/antivirus apps, keep apps up to date, etc.
MadH@er
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
7/17/2020 | 3:36:48 AM
Smartphone/Easy Target
Smartphones carry more risk than most think of.  Even with a BYOD in place at work it still dosnt protect form data being siphoned off of personal use.  With everything we keep in our phones.  Sure some only have a phone book and little more but that might be all that was needed.
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