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2/2/2016
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7 Signs of Infosec's Groundhog Day Syndrome

Irritations that plague security pros day in and day out.
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Image Source: NitehawkCinema.com

Image Source: NitehawkCinema.com

Sometimes working in information security can make people feel a little bit like Sisyphus. Or, at least like Bill Murray in the movie "Groundhog Day."

You wake up and the same types of weaknesses in your people and technology are being attacked by the same criminals day in and day out. Meanwhile, many security leaders keep having the same conversations with their bosses and colleagues without moving the needle forward with meaningful protections.

Sure the threats may be constantly changing, but in the end the same storylines play themselves out over and over again. We talked to experts across the industry about the phenomenon and got their opinions on the most common irritating things that just won't go away in cybersecurity.  The lesson of their observation? Security leaders need to keep in mind that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing and expecting different results.

 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/2/2016 | 6:35:07 PM
passwords
IT usually has only itself to blame for bad user passwords.  There is no user education -- merely "policy."  As if we're likely to believe that replacing a letter with a non-alphanumeric character will magically make our password unbeatable.  As if 30-day or 90-day mandated password resets will really make us think more about security.

Either educate users on effective passwords and how to manage/remember them, or (as a last resort) simply assign them and make sure no one posts it on a sticky note on their monitor.

...but IT departments won't do that because then the blame will fall squarely on their shoulders.  ;)
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