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10/25/2016
03:00 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Scary Ransomware Families

Here are seven ransomware variants that can creep up on you.
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Image Source: Trend Micro

Image Source: Trend Micro

As the season of evil witches, ghosts, goblins, and ghouls approaches, it’s time to be on guard. But security managers face scary prospects year-round, especially as new strains of ransomware escalate. And ransomware variants are getting more pervasive - and creepier - than ever. 

The FBI says that from Jan. 1, 2016 to June 30, 1,308 ransomware complaints have been reported, totaling $2,685,274 in losses. 

And it appears that the ransomware “business” will continue to grow for cybercriminals. Ed Cabrera, chief cybersecurity officer at Trend Micro, says his research team tracked 29 ransomware families last year, and this year is on pace to track well more than 100 variants.

"These ransomware attacks are much different than traditional data breaches in that they go right after the victim," Cabrera says. "It's not like in the past where data was exfiltrated and sold to other criminals."

Most of these ransomware variants encrypt a person’s machine and try to extract a ransom, typically several hundred dollars. What keeps security managers up at night is that ransomware has made its way to the enterprise. The $17,000 ransom paid by Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital earlier this year is of particular note. But new variants attack entire databases and servers – and they now use familiar chat features to make it easier for the victims to pay the ransom.

As a cautionary tale for the season, here are seven of the scariest ransomware variants. This list is based on a consensus drawn from interviews with Trend Micro's Cabrera; Chris Day, CISO of Invincea; and Bryan Lee, threat intel analyst for Unit 42 at Palo Alto Networks.

 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

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lorraine89
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lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
11/1/2016 | 8:52:13 AM
Cyber security
As holiday season nears, it is the by far most lucrative season for hackers and keyboard warriors to sneek into people's data for their monetary gains. Protect IP address with genuine vpn server like PureVPN that offers encryted online connection and those with strict no logs policy. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2016 | 12:15:16 PM
Re: Jigsaw
Wow.  What a (scarily, saddeningly) clever way to still get something out of those who have had the foresight to back up their data (and, accordingly, otherwise wouldn't pay to get ransomed data unlocked).
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2016 | 12:12:27 PM
Re: Jigsaw
@Dr.T: On top of that, it's a way for them to "double-dip."  First, pay up to get your data back.  Next, pay up so that no one else gets it.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
10/27/2016 | 12:11:24 PM
Re: Ransomware; new industry
@Dr.T: A big contributing factor to why this "industry" developed has to do with spam.  After the huge spam crackdown a few years ago, black-hatters had these botnets and malware under their control...but spamming was no longer particularly profitable or worth the risk for them.  Accordingly, they had to come up with new business models.

Enter ransomware.

Ironically enough, if we had left the spammers alone, we might not have seen this particular "innovation."
Shantaram
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Shantaram,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2016 | 6:01:27 PM
Re: 192.168.l.l
It's really impressive

thx
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2016 | 3:17:20 PM
Re: Jigsaw
"... doxware ..."

I was reading about this the other day, obviously when the victim does not pay for the old files hackers still want to get someting out of it. 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2016 | 3:14:54 PM
Re: Jigsaw
"... As companies grow aware of the threat of ransomware ..."

I say they are not. It looks like companies are willing to pay to get the data back instead of investing a good backup system.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2016 | 3:12:32 PM
Re: Jigsaw
"... Jigsaw's scheme is particularly brilliant  ..."

there might be better ways but it is impressive.

 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2016 | 3:09:30 PM
Re: candid photographer
" ... Excellent blog  ...":

Agree. Good information.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/26/2016 | 3:08:27 PM
Ransomware; new industry
I could not believe that there has been a new instruct created out of cyber-attacks. We are not in the right track at all.
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