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10/8/2019
11:30 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Considerations Before Adopting Security Standards

Here's what to think through as you prepare your organization for standards compliance.
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ISO 27001. PCI DSS. GDPR. When it comes to business and security standards, it's easy to get lost in the alphabet soup of acronyms.

How can you discern which ones are right for your organization? Start by asking some high-level questions as to what you hope to accomplish by adopting them – and how adhering to standards can help your growth, says Khushbu Pratap, a senior principal analyst at Gartner who covers risk and compliance.

"The most important questions to ask [are]: Are your customers asking for it, and do your stakeholders think a particular standard is important?" says Pratap.

Assuming the answers are yes, there are additional factors to think through before moving ahead with a strategy for compliance. The seven practical tips outlined in this feature will help. Heavily regulated organizations typically have special teams that work on these standards, but even for them, use this list as a chance to take a step back and better target your standards compliance and certification teams.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

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MarkL199
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MarkL199,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/23/2019 | 4:59:45 AM
ISO 27001 used as a Framework
I agree with the article in that you really need to understand the business drivers, but I also think that a vast majority of business would be best served using ISO 27001 as their Information Security Management System. This gives the framework for their security program as a whole, from the creation of policies to performing compliance activities. I would not even consider certification, unless there is an overwhelming need. The next decision is whether to use the controls contained within ISO 27001, or take the opportunity to swap out more suitable controls (e.g. NIST, CIS20, ISF, PCI DSS etc.). The good thing about ISO 27001 is that it does give a wide coverage of controls across a security program, such as covering non IT-related area's most other controls don't (e.g. policies, people, physical etc.) However, ISO 27001 can be a bit high level and not detailed enough, even if using ISO 27002. This is where tailoring your controls either by using say NIST SP 800-53 across your enterprise, or specific requirements (e.g. PCI DSS). I personally like to use ISO27001 as the framework and also utilise the non-tech controls contained within. Then I would bring in more specific controls to cover the technical side, cloud specific, privacy, IoT etc. My concern about going straight to NIST is that although they are excellent controls, they are designed for information systems and therefore focus on the IT security side and not really a holistic information security program. Lack resources, time, or just need to get some technical controls in fast? I would go with CIS20 controls as they are very easy to follow and lead you through a three stage maturity process.
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