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6/25/2015
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5 Things You Probably Missed In The Verizon DBIR

A look at a few of the lesser-noticed but meaty nuggets in the annual Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR).
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Image: Verizon

More Than Half Of Web Application Attacks Via Stolen Credentials

Web application security often focuses on the bugs: SQL injection, cross-site scripting, validation errors, and other flaws. But the Verizon report shows that most breaches occur via stolen user credentials harvested via key loggers or other malware, for instance.
Spitler points out that 95% of Web application attacks in financial, public, and information industries, came via credentials stolen from their customers. The attackers basically used their customers' credentials to access the Web apps. 
'What we have here are companies ... relying on the security of their customer base,' he says. 'Over one half of Web app attacks came from the use of stolen credentials ... regardless of the [attackers'] motives.'

Image: Verizon

More Than Half Of Web Application Attacks Via Stolen Credentials

Web application security often focuses on the bugs: SQL injection, cross-site scripting, validation errors, and other flaws. But the Verizon report shows that most breaches occur via stolen user credentials harvested via key loggers or other malware, for instance.

Spitler points out that 95% of Web application attacks in financial, public, and information industries, came via credentials stolen from their customers. The attackers basically used their customers' credentials to access the Web apps.

"What we have here are companies relying on the security of their customer base," he says. "Over one half of Web app attacks came from the use of stolen credentials regardless of the [attackers'] motives."

3 of 6
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Sara Peters
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 1:17:08 PM
relying on their customers' security
Great stuff Kelly. I love the way they put this:  "What we have here are companies ... relying on the security of their customer base. Over one half of Web app attacks came from the use of stolen credentials." So basically organizations are outsourcing security to their customers, and I suppose to the other organizations that the customers do business with.
LanceCottrell
LanceCottrell,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 1:50:50 PM
Mobile Malware not a significant threat
It is nice to see this confirmation that, despite all the products and hot air from security vendors, mobile devices are not where the security breaches are happening. Windows is still by far the low hanging fruit for attackers.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
6/26/2015 | 2:43:37 PM
Re: Mobile Malware not a significant threat
Yep, attackers always start with the easy entry point. But as Marc Spitler said, it's only a matter of time before mobile devices are a big part of the attack chain. 
geeksonrepair
geeksonrepair,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2015 | 4:35:04 AM
5 things you missed
I like your way of presentation.Thanks dear for such an informatic blog.
Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 11:12:03 PM
Re: Mobile Malware not a significant threat
I think you forgot the word "yet."  ;)

Sure, Windows is where the action is...but that's more a function of its proliferation/market dominance and less a function of how many vulnerabilities it has.  (In 2014, for instance, several times more vulnerabilities -- and of greater severity on the whole -- were discovered in Linux, OSX, and iOS than in any Windows OS.)

Same thing if we look at mobile only, too.  iOS has way more vulnerabilities than Android, but Android is attacked way more often than iOS because there are so many more Android phones out there than iOS phones (and because it's far easier to attack people via malicious apps on Android than it is on iOS because of Apple's tight iTunes Store controls).

Anyway, it's worthwhile to keep an eye on everything across the board.  There's little telling how the results will differ five or ten years from now.
bhalladeva
bhalladeva,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/22/2015 | 8:14:43 AM
Re: 5 things you missed
ata and rare insight on real-world incidents and breach cases, but with the addition of loads of data contributed by 70 other organizations from around the world.

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