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Endpoint

10/28/2016
02:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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5 Signs Your Smartphone Has Been Hacked

Mobile devices are increasingly popular vectors for cybercriminals targeting the enterprise. How to tell when a smartphone may be under attack.
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Presence Of Mysterious Apps

Victims' phones may suddenly have apps they don't remember installing, says Murray. While this may mean one thing if a user has kids who like to play with his or her phone, it's a different story if the user is the only person with access to the device. "If I can put an app on your phone, I can do anything on your phone that the app can do," he warns. Sophisticated malware can entirely take over a device, giving the attacker full access. "We are seeing a very fast evolution of malicious apps in mobile," says Amit. A few years ago, fraudulent apps were considered annoyances; they may have been used to snoop on SMS messaging, but rarely did much beyond that. Now, malicious apps are being used more for genuinely harmful purposes. Hackers can plant apps on employee devices to snoop, perform actions on their behalf, explore their calendars, and access their GPS. "The most sophisticated attacks are very covert," says Amit. "They hide themselves." He recommends employees avoid downloading apps if they don't understand why they need them. This advice goes beyond mobile, he notes, and extends to all digital devices used in the enterprise.

Twin Design via Shutterstock

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JamesF695
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JamesF695,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/30/2016 | 2:22:07 PM
Thanks!
This was useful and informative
prostarjackets
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prostarjackets,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/3/2016 | 3:49:06 AM
hi
The creative writing has inspired me a lot. I hope to see the same effort in the future too.

 
newamericanjackets at the walking dead jacket

I read the whole article by the author and I must say it is very nice. Thank for your sharing.
rjbarbal
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rjbarbal,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/4/2016 | 12:51:02 PM
What to do next
Giving the signs of a hacked smartphone is useful for recognition, but including advice on what to do next to recover would be even better.  So, what to do next?  Here are some ideas on what to do if you suspect that your phone or other mobile device is infected:
  • install and run mobile anti-malware software (preferably from more than one vendor)
  • remove any apps that you don't recognize
  • consider wiping the device, restoring factory settings, and reinstalling apps from trusted appstores
  • use mobile security software on your device going forward
  • consider showing the device to a professional, especially if you think it might have been rooted
  • seek the cause of the infection, if possible, and take training on preventing future incidents
  • work with your incident response team to determine the extent of any breach of confidential data and how to respond
  • be more careful in the future

 
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