Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Endpoint

4/19/2017
04:20 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

3 Tips for Updating an Endpoint Security Strategy

How to face the process of navigating new threats, tools, and features to build an effective endpoint security strategy.

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to endpoint security, a space that has become inundated with products competing to solve a problem that has challenged businesses for years.

The last three to four years have driven the emergence of new options and ways of looking at endpoint security technology, says Mike Spanbauer, vice president of strategy at NSS labs. All of these tools rely on different features; all are suited for different strategies.

It's up to businesses to determine which tools are best to meet their needs based on their distinct approach to endpoint security.

"There is no such thing as perfect," Spanbauer says of choosing a tool. "This is one security control, in your grand security architecture, that must be complemented by a lot of secure technologies."

Securing the desktops within any organization, whether it's a large enterprise or SMB, comes with challenges. For businesses working to update their strategies, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

Prioritize your needs

To update an endpoint security strategy and pick the tools to support it, you need to determine your use cases, says Spanbauer. This will fall to the team who manages security tools and is responsible for handling the forensic parts of incident response.

"The teams with products that need to be supported will dictate which features really matter," he explains. For SMBs without dedicated incident response teams, he recommends developing more resilient backup processes in case of an attack.

Use cases for endpoint tech will also vary depending on your organization's data center and its data services, ports, protocols, architectures, and applications.

As businesses incorporate devices connected to the IoT, they will need to be increasingly aware of their larger attack surface, prioritize services and assets that need to be protected, and know where they are located.

Determine how to collaborate

On a broader level, it's important to establish a good working relationship with other data-conscious groups within the organization. Desktop support, for example, is an important collaborator for security teams.

While sometimes there can be contention among groups, Spanbauer acknowledges the importance of recognizing you're all on the same team. This means regular, dedicated interactions. He also advises building a workflow process so everyone knows how to partner with one another in the event of an emergency.

Have a backup plan

Even businesses taking all the right steps can suffer a breach. When they do, it's important to have their data backed up.

"Most enterprises have a backup" strategy" says Spanbauer. "I just don't believe it's strictly enforced."

He also emphasizes enforcing endpoint security practices; for example, logging out of administrative accounts for basic productivity that doesn't require administrative control. It's a simple step that could make a big difference: if you click a malicious Office attachment as an admin, you could accidentally give a hacker access to conduct a more sinister attack.

"It's convenient, it's easy, but as a best practice you shouldn't be writing Word documents or emails as an admin on your machine," he continues. "You have access to those apps without [administrative control]."

[Mike Spanbauer will be speaking about endpoint security strategy as part of his session "Updating Your Endpoint Security Strategy: Is the Endpoint a New Breed, Unicorn, or Endangered Species?" during Interop ITX, May 15-19, at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. To learn more about his presentation, other Interop security tracks, or to register click on the live links.]

Related Content:

Kelly Sheridan is the Staff Editor at Dark Reading, where she focuses on cybersecurity news and analysis. She is a business technology journalist who previously reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft, and Insurance & Technology, where she covered financial ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
lizapleasant
50%
50%
lizapleasant,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/23/2017 | 5:59:50 AM
thanks
Thanks you a lot! I 'll implement it in my company!
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/14/2020
Omdia Research Launches Page on Dark Reading
Tim Wilson, Editor in Chief, Dark Reading 7/9/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-10287
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
The IRC5 family with UAS service enabled comes by default with credentials that can be found on publicly available manuals. ABB considers this a well documented functionality that helps customer set up however, out of our research, we found multiple production systems running these exact default cre...
CVE-2020-10288
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
IRC5 exposes an ftp server (port 21). Upon attempting to gain access you are challenged with a request of username and password, however you can input whatever you like. As long as the field isn't empty it will be accepted.
CVE-2020-15780
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
An issue was discovered in drivers/acpi/acpi_configfs.c in the Linux kernel before 5.7.7. Injection of malicious ACPI tables via configfs could be used by attackers to bypass lockdown and secure boot restrictions, aka CID-75b0cea7bf30.
CVE-2019-17639
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
In Eclipse OpenJ9 prior to version 0.21 on Power platforms, calling the System.arraycopy method with a length longer than the length of the source or destination array can, in certain specially crafted code patterns, cause the current method to return prematurely with an undefined return value. This...
CVE-2019-20908
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
An issue was discovered in drivers/firmware/efi/efi.c in the Linux kernel before 5.4. Incorrect access permissions for the efivar_ssdt ACPI variable could be used by attackers to bypass lockdown or secure boot restrictions, aka CID-1957a85b0032.