Endpoint

4/26/2018
01:15 PM
Sara Peters
Sara Peters
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail

12 Trends Shaping Identity Management

As IAM companies try to stretch 'identity context' into all points of the cybersecurity market, identity is becoming 'its own solar system.'
3 of 13

GDPR Gives Individuals Ownership of Their Own Identities 

Organizations have grown accustomed to behaving as though any name in a database is a name that belongs to them - collecting, storing, transmitting, buying, and selling individuals' personally identifiable information with relative impunity. The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) changes all that - and it amps up organizations' need for identity governance.

GDPR requires organizations to obtain explicit permission from individuals anytime they collect or share their personal information - autochecked boxes are not explicit enough - and individuals must be able to easily revoke that permission at any time. Individuals have a 'right to be forgotten.' Further, records must be kept of where this identity information is being used everywhere the data flows. 

GDPR applies to any EU citizen data anywhere, so it affects companies across the globe, and it applies to both organizations' customers and their employees, so it will have an impact on both their governance and security of internal and external identities. ForgeRock, which specifically provides IAM for external users, added a GDPR dashboard to their product. 

Enforcement actions for GDPR begin May 25 (after a two-year grace period since the act officially went into place). Those actions include but are not limited to fines of 20 million euros or 4% of annual revenue, whichever is higher.

'GDPR is really seminal,' says Herjavec. Like PCI it will move the industry, but unlike PCI, it affects all industries. He says he's '100% certain' that Canada and the US will have their own version of it.

(Image by Good_Stock, via Shutterstock)

GDPR Gives Individuals Ownership of Their Own Identities

Organizations have grown accustomed to behaving as though any name in a database is a name that belongs to them - collecting, storing, transmitting, buying, and selling individuals' personally identifiable information with relative impunity. The European Union's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) changes all that - and it amps up organizations' need for identity governance.

GDPR requires organizations to obtain explicit permission from individuals anytime they collect or share their personal information - autochecked boxes are not explicit enough - and individuals must be able to easily revoke that permission at any time. Individuals have a "right to be forgotten." Further, records must be kept of where this identity information is being used everywhere the data flows.

GDPR applies to any EU citizen data anywhere, so it affects companies across the globe, and it applies to both organizations' customers and their employees, so it will have an impact on both their governance and security of internal and external identities. ForgeRock, which specifically provides IAM for external users, added a GDPR dashboard to their product.

Enforcement actions for GDPR begin May 25 (after a two-year grace period since the act officially went into place). Those actions include but are not limited to fines of 20 million euros or 4% of annual revenue, whichever is higher.

"GDPR is really seminal," says Herjavec. Like PCI it will move the industry, but unlike PCI, it affects all industries. He says he's "100% certain" that Canada and the US will have their own version of it.

(Image by Good_Stock, via Shutterstock)

3 of 13
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
4/30/2018 | 11:18:25 PM
not only are they manageable, theyre fundamentally consumable from a price point
This item has monumental importance. For IAM and PAM to gain widespread acceptance it needed to become some what of a commodity amongst the different organziational sectors. 
It Takes an Average of 3 to 6 Months to Fill a Cybersecurity Job
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  3/12/2019
Cybercriminals Think Small to Earn Big
Dark Reading Staff 3/12/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: LOL  Hope this one wins
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
Organizations are responding to new threats with new processes for detecting and mitigating them. Here's a look at how the discipline of incident response is evolving.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-6149
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-18
An unquoted search path vulnerability was identified in Lenovo Dynamic Power Reduction Utility prior to version 2.2.2.0 that could allow a malicious user with local access to execute code with administrative privileges.
CVE-2018-15509
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-18
Five9 Agent Desktop Plus 10.0.70 has Incorrect Access Control (issue 2 of 2).
CVE-2018-20806
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-17
Phamm (aka PHP LDAP Virtual Hosting Manager) 0.6.8 allows XSS via the login page (the /public/main.php action parameter).
CVE-2019-5616
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-15
CircuitWerkes Sicon-8, a hardware device used for managing electrical devices, ships with a web-based front-end controller and implements an authentication mechanism in JavaScript that is run in the context of a user's web browser.
CVE-2018-17882
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-15
An Integer overflow vulnerability exists in the batchTransfer function of a smart contract implementation for CryptoBotsBattle (CBTB), an Ethereum token. This vulnerability could be used by an attacker to create an arbitrary amount of tokens for any user.