Endpoint

10/5/2017
11:40 AM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
Slideshows
50%
50%

10 Steps for Writing a Secure Mobile App

Best practices to avoid the dangers of developing vulnerability-ridden apps.
Previous
1 of 11
Next

Image Source: Pedrosek via Shutterstock

Image Source: Pedrosek via Shutterstock

More than 4 million mobile apps are currently in production, but only 29% on average are tested for bugs, and nearly a third of these contain significant vulnerabilities, according to a recent Ponemon Institute survey.

Enterprises, meanwhile, are expected to accelerate their mobile app development in the coming months, according to a recent Gartner survey. On average, enterprises deployed eight mobile apps from the start of the year, with nearly nine more on tap or planned through June, the survey found.

"Developers are less careful when developing apps for internal use because they want to develop it fast, so it can achieve some purpose," says Vivien Raoul, chief technical officer and co-founder of Pradeo, which recently published the Mobile Application Security Guide.

Whether enterprises are developing mobile apps for internal use or to aid customers in using their service, they face consequences if a mobile app is vulnerable security-wise. In addition, organizations whose apps are for customers stand the risk of getting hit with a civil complaint if the apps aren't up to snuff security-wise.

The Federal Trade Commission, for example, has been slapping companies with civil lawsuits over the way enterprises have handled the security of their mobile app development efforts. Enterprises that have felt the FTC's wrath include Upromise, Credit Karma, and Fandango.

Here are key steps for creating a secure enterprise mobile app:

 

Dawn Kawamoto is an Associate Editor for Dark Reading, where she covers cybersecurity news and trends. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 11
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
'Hidden Tunnels' Help Hackers Launch Financial Services Attacks
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  6/20/2018
Inside a SamSam Ransomware Attack
Ajit Sancheti, CEO and Co-Founder, Preempt,  6/20/2018
Tesla Employee Steals, Sabotages Company Data
Jai Vijayan, Freelance writer,  6/19/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-12705
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-24
DIGISOL DG-BR4000NG devices have XSS via the SSID (it is validated only on the client side).
CVE-2018-12706
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-24
DIGISOL DG-BR4000NG devices have a Buffer Overflow via a long Authorization HTTP header.
CVE-2018-12714
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-24
An issue was discovered in the Linux kernel through 4.17.2. The filter parsing in kernel/trace/trace_events_filter.c could be called with no filter, which is an N=0 case when it expected at least one line to have been read, thus making the N-1 index invalid. This allows attackers to cause a denial o...
CVE-2018-12713
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-24
GIMP through 2.10.2 makes g_get_tmp_dir calls to establish temporary filenames, which may result in a filename that already exists, as demonstrated by the gimp_write_and_read_file function in app/tests/test-xcf.c. This might be leveraged by attackers to overwrite files or read file content that was ...
CVE-2018-12697
PUBLISHED: 2018-06-23
A NULL pointer dereference (aka SEGV on unknown address 0x000000000000) was discovered in work_stuff_copy_to_from in cplus-dem.c in GNU libiberty, as distributed in GNU Binutils 2.30. This can occur during execution of objdump.