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1/13/2017
12:30 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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10 Cocktail Party Security Tips From The Experts

Security pros offer basic advice to help average users ward off the bad guys.
2 of 11

1. Take an inventory of your devices.

Start by writing down a list of all the devices in your house that connect to the Internet. The obvious ones are your laptop, tablet, television, Wi-Fi router, and printer. Other devices such as the thermostat, the refrigerator and lighting may also have IP addresses today. Once you have developed your list, change the default passwords on all those devices, especially the Wi-Fi router that connects your house to the Internet. As you go down the list, turn off Wi-Fi or other connectivity that's not absolutely necessary.

Image Source: Pixabay

1. Take an inventory of your devices.

Start by writing down a list of all the devices in your house that connect to the Internet. The obvious ones are your laptop, tablet, television, Wi-Fi router, and printer. Other devices such as the thermostat, the refrigerator and lighting may also have IP addresses today. Once you have developed your list, change the default passwords on all those devices, especially the Wi-Fi router that connects your house to the Internet. As you go down the list, turn off Wi-Fi or other connectivity thats not absolutely necessary.

Image Source: Pixabay

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Meleon42
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Meleon42,
User Rank: Strategist
1/29/2017 | 10:26:33 PM
Re: guest wireless zone
@Joe

Trust is not an absolute - there are levels.

I trust friends to come into my house, but only a few would I trust to be in the house without a family member present, and others I only trust enough to allow them in if I am there. In the same way, I trust them to access the internet from my home, but I think of it as a matter of least privilege. Why give them more access than they need? Why give them access to other devices present on my network if I can easily create a guest network.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2017 | 1:09:57 PM
Re: guest wireless zone
@Meleon: Okay, that's certainly a more palatable proposition, security-wise, but wait a minute.

Do you trust your friends and their kids?

Then why have a guest Wi-Fi at all?  Why not just give them the password for your "main" Wi-Fi?

After all, you trust them, right?

Because if you don't, then it would be poor practice to give them access of any kind at all.

Now don't get me wrong.  I'm not saying you're somehow wrong to let your friends and their kids use your Wi-Fi.  I'm just suggesting that a guest network probably doesn't really do much for you when you're talking about a personal home connection.  It's probably just as simple as this: either give 'em the router password or don't, and don't worry about guest networks.

That said: In an enterprise/business/institutional environment, sure.  Go to town with guest networks and segregated WiFi logins.  But it's probably unnecessary cybersecurity theatre in the home environment.
Meleon42
50%
50%
Meleon42,
User Rank: Strategist
1/18/2017 | 11:04:01 AM
Re: guest wireless zone
@Joe

yeah, I didn't define my scenario well enough. I agree not to set a network without a password. This would be a separate SSID with password. It would be segmented from the home network. So when my kids' friends are over and ask to use the wireless, I can give them the latest guest password

 
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/18/2017 | 8:48:58 AM
Re: guest wireless zone
@Alex: Respectfully, I disagree with this notion.  I just wouldn't let guests use my Wi-Fi period.

if you have a non-private, password-less zone/network, then bad guys can use it too.

Then you're getting woken up at 5am as armed federal agents bust down your door and raid your house because some pervert in a van parked outside one day used your guest network to access illegal material.

Also, to use a less extreme example, your Torrenting-freak neighbor could easily access such a network to mass-download large media files -- causing bandwidth issues on your own router and modem as you try to do basic things.

And so on and so forth.

Just say no to password-less networks.

Meleon42
100%
0%
Meleon42,
User Rank: Strategist
1/17/2017 | 12:20:54 PM
guest wireless zone
Create a guest wireless zone which only has access to the internet. So when your kids or guests come over they can get on your guest wireless but not have access to your private network
tmbard
100%
0%
tmbard,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/16/2017 | 2:59:02 PM
Home Network Security
Don't forget there are new devices coming to the market that help home network security. A few companies that have these appliances are Bitdefender with Box, and soon Norton with Core. In addition, a few companies have AiProtection from Trend Micro built into the home router solutions.  Adding these devices to your network can help protect all the devices that are connected to your home network.  This ultimately would help solve a lot of the issues that people have when trying to keep their home network secure.
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