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DPS Telecom Releases New RADIUS Authentication Feature For NetGuardian 832A G5

RADIUS provides a way to manage logins to many different types of equipment in one central location.

FRESNO, Calif., May 19 /PRNewswire/ -- DPS Telecom, a leading developer of network alarm monitoring solutions, announced today the release of a new security enhancement for the NetGuardian 832A/864A G5 alarm remote: RADIUS authentication.

RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service) technology is an industry-standard authentication method, and now the NetGuardian 832A/864A G5 can interact with your RADIUS server, integrating it as part of your enterprise management.

RADIUS provides a way to manage logins to many different types of equipment in one central location. The basic architecture is very simple: many RADIUS devices connect to a central RADIUS server. Every time a device receives a login attempt (usually a username & password), it requests an authentication from the central RADIUS server.

Since all authentication requests are handled by the central server and not the devices themselves, updating user profiles and access permissions only has to be done in one place.

NetGuardian remotes have a long history of protecting access to your alarms. For many years, they've required a username and password for remote access. RADIUS technology provides tougher authentication for government, military, and large private firms.

"We saw that a lot of our clients had RADIUS servers already running in their networks," said DPS Telecom President Eric Storm. "We knew we had an opportunity to save them a lot of time and effort, so we engineered RADIUS into our most popular RTU platform."

With the ability to pass NetGuardian login attempts to your RADIUS server, you gain several key security advantages:

1) Virtually unlimited users.

With RADIUS, the number of user logins you can support is huge. It's almost inconceivable that you would ever run out.

2) Centralized management.

You'll also be able to manage your logins from your central RADIUS server. You'll never have to worry about updating any single remote. If an employee leaves your company, you can revoke their access rights very easily.

3) Integration with enterprise management.

When your alarm remotes use the same RADIUS authentication method as your other important gear, you significantly reduce the complexity of managing your equipment. It's always easier to manage a single umbrella than it is to keep track of several unrelated systems.

RADIUS is supported by any NetGuardian G5 platform (832A or 864A, with or without hardware acceleration). To find out how the NetGuardian and RADIUS will work in your own network, visit http://www.dpstele.com/ng_radius

About DPS Telecom:

DPS Telecom is an industry-leading manufacturer of network alarm monitoring solutions. DPS clients include RBOCs, ILECs, CLECs, gas and electric utilities, heavy and light rail transit, government agencies, and manufacturers.

In addition to manufacturing off-the-shelf products, DPS has developed a reputation for providing perfect-fit customization to meet unique client needs. Because the company is vertically integrated, custom products are delivered on short timetables virtually unheard of in the industry.

Contact:

Andrew Erickson, 559-454-1600 Fax: 559-454-1688 Email: [email protected]

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