Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

News

2/19/2008
09:16 PM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
Commentary
Connect Directly
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

That Didn't Take Long

And mercifully so -- the battle over the next-gen DVD came to a close as Toshiba threw in the high-def towel today. But as quickly as data and media formats are evolving, does it really matter?

And mercifully so -- the battle over the next-gen DVD came to a close as Toshiba threw in the high-def towel today. But as quickly as data and media formats are evolving, does it really matter?Sony can do its victory dance that the high-definition DVD war, which unlike its Betamax experience, wasn't decided by what the major porn studios went with (oh, you thought Disney was a big VHS supporter?). Instead, Sony smartly struck support deals with the major mainstream studios, then started adding big-box retailers as allies. A shame this couldn't have been settled before we all finished last year's Christmas shopping, but Sony's win here may be academic anyway.

Here's why. Witness the unmistakable momentum of downloaded media -- movies, television shows, YouTube clips, and regular old audio files. The shape-shifting hard drive shows up as an iPhone, a notebook computer, a TiVo recorder. It would seem to render moot the issue of how your rented, physical media is recorded, or played back.

Are Netflix and Blockbuster going to look like the equivalent of payphone operators in 2013? If I threw a Magic 8-Ball in the air, I bet I'd get a decidedly low-def reply: "Definitely. Maybe sooner."

Jan Saxton, VP of analyst firm Adams Media Research, is less convinced of any quick migration. "Eventually we will probably move to an all-download world, but as of year-end 2007, total consumer spending on Internet video purchases was 1% of total video purchase spending," Saxton wrote in an e-mail today. "So it isn't going to happen any time soon."

There are obviously lots of variables in this equation:

-- How fast the studios wake up to the power of downloading while still retaining control and profitability

-- What happens with holographic storage -- even though it's being developed more for enterprise applications, why couldn't it cross over to consumers? Conversely, what's to keep Blu-ray from making holographic storage redundant or needless?

-- How many more hard drives will enter our lives in unexpected applications or shapes? Think automobiles, kitchens, or the inevitable Rent-A-Petabyte services that are bound to pop up to keep all our personal and professional content safe and secure

That's a picture that will take some time to come into clear, sharp focus.

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/14/2020
Omdia Research Launches Page on Dark Reading
Tim Wilson, Editor in Chief, Dark Reading 7/9/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-4462
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-16
IBM Sterling External Authentication Server 6.0.1, 6.0.0, 2.4.3.2, and 2.4.2 and IBM Sterling Secure Proxy 6.0.1, 6.0.0, 3.4.3, and 3.4.2 are vulnerable to an XML External Entity Injection (XXE) attack when processing XML data. A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to expose sensitive i...
CVE-2019-4747
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-16
IBM Team Concert (RTC) is vulnerable to cross-site scripting. This vulnerability allows users to embed arbitrary JavaScript code in the Web UI thus altering the intended functionality potentially leading to credentials disclosure within a trusted session. IBM X-Force ID: 172887.
CVE-2019-4748
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-16
IBM Jazz Team Server based Applications are vulnerable to cross-site scripting. This vulnerability allows users to embed arbitrary JavaScript code in the Web UI thus altering the intended functionality potentially leading to credentials disclosure within a trusted session. IBM X-Force ID: 173174.
CVE-2020-14000
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-16
MIT Lifelong Kindergarten Scratch scratch-vm before 0.2.0-prerelease.20200714185213 loads extension URLs from untrusted project.json files with certain _ characters, resulting in remote code execution because the URL's content is treated as a script and is executed as a worker. The responsible code ...
CVE-2020-15027
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-16
ConnectWise Automate through 2020.x has insufficient validation on certain authentication paths, allowing authentication bypass via a series of attempts. This was patched in 2020.7 and in a hotfix for 2019.12.