Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

News

2/28/2008
07:41 PM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
Commentary
Connect Directly
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Stomping On Your Carbon Footprint

The "greening" of IT is very à la mode right now, especially in storage. But this umbrella term suffers from overuse, and near as I can tell, is a euphemism for using less electricity. It's also a "feature" that enables some vendors to bump up their prices. So what exactly is the fuss again?

The "greening" of IT is very à la mode right now, especially in storage. But this umbrella term suffers from overuse, and near as I can tell, is a euphemism for using less electricity. It's also a "feature" that enables some vendors to bump up their prices. So what exactly is the fuss again?What we used to call consolidation and virtualization (for servers or storage) now gets the green treatment. One of Ford's IT directors touted the two data center movements at a conference Thursday. I don't doubt there's probably a really good business case behind it. But do fewer servers and LUNs make an enterprise green?

Vendors of data deduplication and MAID (massive array of idle disks) technology have jumped on this eco-bandwagon. Are we really going to label any technology that conveys the slightest operational efficiency as green?

I click off the power strip in my home office every night. Where's my Nobel?

Yeah, right. I'm not the first to question the usefulness or substance to the green claims of IT vendors. Jon Toigo's far more eloquent on this topic than I'll ever be. He properly scoffs at vendors that want you to buy more stuff (but it's green stuff, see) to save money and scorns users who fail to use the greenest button on their keyboard. (Hint: It's marked 'Delete.')

Personally, I'd like to see all IT vendors expand their understanding and implementation of green technology. How about getting really serious about wide-scale recycling of servers, laptops, cell phones, batteries -- you name it. Maybe they could trumpet the amount of reclaimed metals in their products.

Or maybe vendors could funnel some of their foundation money or R&D budgets to a joint venture with a solar- or wind-power company to demonstrate (or expedite) the off-grid data center? They could even lobby state and national lawmakers for tax incentives to make this happen. I'm not a Prius owner, but rebates and credits did wonders for the sales of hybrids here in California.

It would be nice to see the greening of IT take another couple big, logical steps -- something a little larger than turning off the lights in the data center on the way out at night.

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/14/2020
Omdia Research Launches Page on Dark Reading
Tim Wilson, Editor in Chief, Dark Reading 7/9/2020
Why Cybersecurity's Silence Matters to Black Lives
Tiffany Ricks, CEO, HacWare,  7/8/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-14499
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
Advantech iView, versions 5.6 and prior, has an improper access control vulnerability. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow an attacker to obtain all user accounts credentials.
CVE-2020-14501
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
Advantech iView, versions 5.6 and prior, has an improper authentication for critical function (CWE-306) issue. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow an attacker to obtain the information of the user table, including the administrator credentials in plain text. An attacker may also ...
CVE-2020-14503
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
Advantech iView, versions 5.6 and prior, has an improper input validation vulnerability. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability could allow an attacker to remotely execute arbitrary code.
CVE-2020-14497
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
Advantech iView, versions 5.6 and prior, contains multiple SQL injection vulnerabilities that are vulnerable to the use of an attacker-controlled string in the construction of SQL queries. An attacker could extract user credentials, read or modify information, and remotely execute code.
CVE-2020-14505
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-15
Advantech iView, versions 5.6 and prior, has an improper neutralization of special elements used in a command (“command injection�) vulnerability. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow an attacker to send a HTTP GET or POST request that create...