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3/13/2018
04:10 PM
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What CISOs Should Know About Quantum Computing

As quantum computing approaches real-world viability, it also poses a huge threat to today's encryption measures.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock (zapp2photo)

Image Source: Adobe Stock (zapp2photo)

Quantum computing is quickly moving from the theoretical world to reality. Last week Google researchers revealed a new quantum computing processor that the company says may beat the best benchmark in computing power set by today's most advanced supercomputers.

That's bad news for CISOs because most experts agree that once quantum computing advances far enough and spreads wide enough, today's encryption measures are toast. General consensus is that within about a decade, quantum computers will be able to brute-force public key encryption as it is designed today.

Here are some key things to know and consider about this next generation of computing and its ultimate impact on security.

 

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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grhooper
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grhooper,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/1/2018 | 10:41:21 AM
No slideshows, please
The articles are helpful, but please just put the list on one page instead of creating a slideshow where I have to click everytime I want to read the next paragraph. It makes me want to just leave the site.
Egbert O'Foo
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Egbert O'Foo,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/30/2018 | 10:32:48 AM
...
Hmm.  Certainly if we've learned anything from AI, it's that we'll need to ensure perfect accuracy before we can really rely on quantum computing.

Just in case it's not obvious to anyone (like it wasn't obvious to me) ... on the first page you may need to click on the image to start the slideshow and get to the content.
Julia Haleniuk
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Julia Haleniuk,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/14/2018 | 9:24:03 AM
Good article!
Thank you for the great article, Ericka!
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