Cloud
6/5/2017
04:35 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Oracle Brings Machine Learning to its CASB Service

Machine learning is a next step for cloud systems, as Oracle integrates new capabilities into its CASB offering to discern and leverage user behavior.

Oracle and other companies are integrating new technologies into their cloud access security broker (CASB) offerings to ratchet up security.

Database giant Oracle today announced that it has integrated machine learning, artificial intelligence, and contextual awareness in its CASB service. The idea is to address the growth of security incidents targeting privileged and end-user credentials.

Cloud vendors are competing to address two important issues, says Andy Smith, senior director of product development for Oracle's security portfolio. They are trying to figure out how to bring their products to the cloud, and how to develop the tech to secure their own clouds.

CASB providers are under pressure to create new technologies for better cloud management. These systems sit between cloud service customers and cloud providers to consolidate the enforcement of security policies.

In the past, mostly large businesses demanded CASB systems. "The larger you are, the more complex you are, you have hundreds of cloud services," says Cloud Security Alliance CEO Jim Reavis.

However, as more information and key data assets are moved off-premise, small- and medium-sized businesses are looking into CASB adoption for greater visibility into their organizations.

Oracle's new approach uses supervised and unsupervised machine learning for advanced threat detection. The system detects and stores user actions and compares them with established patterns to determine abnormal activity on each cloud service.

The user behavior analytics (UBA) engine sets historical baselines for each user and service (Box, Office 365, etc.). When it finds behavior derives from the norm, it launches incident response options such as incident management systems and automated remediation.

Unsupervised machine learning compares users' behavior with their previous actions to determine risk. "It creates its own normal" by using algorithms to verify whether activity is anomalistic, says Smith. This "normal" continuously changes based on data it receives.

Supervised machine learning is more customizable: Administrators can specify personal attributes or CRM activity they want to analyze, and create a correlation to look for actions that are against policy. The system had always integrated unsupervised machine learning, but now users can identify what they want to look for, he says.

Say an employee has been put on notice and the business is worried about data theft, for example, he says. Admins can monitor correlations between when someone is put on notice and whether they attempt to steal data before they leave the company.

"They can use it for any kind of risky behavior and apply it to any types of threats," says Smith. "The main one we always think about is compromised accounts," or those that people are concerned about because of phishing or credential theft."

To better monitor risk, the company is bringing what it calls adaptive access to its Identity-Based Security Operations Center (SOC). This new approach to access control will use machine learning to combat fraud across cloud applications by analyzing each login attempt and data on location, device, and time of day.

"The concept of adaptive access isn't new," says Smith. "Doing it where it's built into the cloud service and integrated into other risk services -- that's what's new."

Oracle's CASB is introducing security monitoring and threat detection for several applications, including its own Oracle Human Capital Management (HCM) Cloud, Oracle Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Cloud, and Oracle Customer Experience (CX) Cloud Suite. This is in addition to tools like Slack, Office 365, Box, Google G-Suite, AWS, ServiceNow, GitHub, and Rackspace.

Smith emphasizes the importance of ensuring the CASB integrates with the rest of the security fabric. For him, the key is making sure the system covers SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS so the business isn't using multiple CASB systems to get full security coverage.

Related Content:

Black Hat USA returns to the fabulous Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Nevada, July 22-27, 2017. Click for information on the conference schedule and to register.

Kelly Sheridan is Associate Editor at Dark Reading. She started her career in business tech journalism at Insurance & Technology and most recently reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft and business IT. Sheridan earned her BA at Villanova University. View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Security Operations and IT Operations: Finding the Path to Collaboration
A wide gulf has emerged between SOC and NOC teams that's keeping both of them from assuring the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of IT systems. Here's how experts think it should be bridged.
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In past years, security researchers have discovered ways to hack cars, medical devices, automated teller machines, and many other targets. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts researcher Samy Kamkar and Levi Gundert, vice president of threat intelligence at Recorded Future, to discuss some of 2016's most unusual and creative hacks by white hats, and what these new vulnerabilities might mean for the coming year.