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Cloud

4/12/2019
10:50 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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8 'SOC-as-a-Service' Offerings

These new cloud services seek to help companies figure out what their traditional SIEM alerts mean, plus how they can prioritize responses and improve their security operations.
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AaronB633
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AaronB633,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2019 | 5:30:14 PM
SOC-as-a-Service is critical for mid-market
Glad to see SOC-as-a-Service highlighted as a practical solution for the masses that don't have the wherewithal to staff, resource, and retain an in-house SOC. It's also interesting to see the debate over the definition of this as a defined market. As a side effect of a fast-paced growing market, the phraseology of what's what is very nuanced. What's the difference between an MSSP, a co-managed SIEM, or a SOC-as-a-Service? Depends on who you ask. It would be interesting for sure to see a detailed and agreed-upon definition for each.

Vendors, such as ourselves, can easily see ourselves fitting all three of those categories. At Netsurion, we deliver what we call a co-managed SIEM. I would say that it easily aligns with the concept of a SOC-as-a-Service as well. It includes a fractional SOC team (EventTracker SOC) to fit the needs of the organization, that operates a SIEM platform (EventTracker SIEM) complete with managed security services like vulnerability assessment service, managed EDR (EventTracker EDR), and even managed threat deception service (EventTracker Honeynet) to name a few.

I think regardless of where you land on MSSP, co-managed SIEM, and SOC-as-a-Service markets, most would agree that more technology alone is not going to cut it for 90% of organizations with a security team of 1... or none. All of these solutions address the need for cybersecurity convergence, but are different in what degree do they provide product, people, and process to solve the problem. What layers of defense are within scope? How is it deployed and maintained? How are responsibilities aligned between vendor and customer? 
seven_stones
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seven_stones,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/20/2019 | 2:09:36 PM
Re: SOC-as-a-Service is critical for mid-market
"Figure out what their traditional SIEM alerts mean"? The meaning is usually fairly clear from the default alert text. What the vast majority of organisations need is help with first configuring meaningful alerts (not just the defaults) and then how to respond to them - and this is only possible after gaining intimate knowledge of the environment. Is this part of the offering also? I doubt it because that wouldn't be economical - it does actually take time and skilled resource.

SIEM cannot be outsourced aside from the first level response of a SOC capability - and then only after the aforementioned use cases are configured and the capability is tuned - 18 months at least.

These services do little more than add to the problem.
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