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6/23/2018
08:00 AM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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8 Security Tips for a Hassle-Free Summer Vacation

It's easy to let your guard down when you're away. Hackers know that, too.
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Image Source: Shutterstock via studiostoks

Image Source: Shutterstock via studiostoks

It's easy to let your security guard down when you're away on vacation. Worries about credit cards, online bank accounts, and sensitive medical information getting into the wrong hands tend to fall by the wayside.

Hackers know that, too. Lurking in the ether, they're waiting for you to make a misstep.

"We don't want to discourage travel, but people need to understand that when you travel, your security is at a higher risk than normal," says Daniel Eliot, director of small business programs at the National Cyber Security Alliance.

What's a traveler to do? Eliot, along with T. Frank Downs, director of SME cybersecurity practices at ISACA, offer eight security tips that corporate users and home office workers can use to stay safe this summer. After all, the last thing anyone needs when trying to wind down is a nasty ransomware attack. Have fun – and be safe.

Why Cybercriminals Attack: A DARK READING VIRTUAL EVENT Wednesday, June 27. Industry experts will offer a range of information and insight on who the bad guys are – and why they might be targeting your enterprise. Go here for more information on this free event.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience and has covered networking, security, and IT as a writer and editor since 1992. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio
 

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/23/2018 | 6:33:10 PM
Not just for vacations
These tips are important outside of the vacation context too. For my own part, I don't access public Wi-Fi period except in the rarest of circumstances with the least circumstantial risk.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2018 | 8:18:16 AM
Re: Not just for vacations
Public Wife is a danger of course but always more dangerous is the User accessing stupidly on the network, whether corporate protected or wide open pubic.  The basics are easy - never open attachments unless WELL known and verified.  Watch web browsing always.  Watch activity.  SCAN system upon boot always.  If suspect, shut down immed.  Sys restore if you want.  Simple, easy things. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2018 | 11:31:53 PM
Re: Not just for vacations
@REISEN: You wouldn't believe how frequently people I barely know (if not strangers) send PDFs to me. Legitimate ones. But I refuse to open them without some sort of verification, because they should know better, period.
Patrick Ciavolella
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Patrick Ciavolella,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2018 | 8:26:06 AM
Basic items too often forgotten
Great read, and all very interesting items that are often forgotten when "vacation mode" kicks in.  Updating passwords, or simply change them before you leave and once you return in my case, is a great tactic that is almost never used by the general population.  Physical Security is a big item people often forget about.  Posts made on Social Media stating you are out of town and gone until a certain date open the door for home security and theft, but are almost never thought about in the moment.  
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