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11/17/2016
12:00 PM
Sean Martin
Sean Martin
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8 Public Sources Holding 'Private' Information

Personal information used for nefarious purposes can be found all over the web - from genealogy sites to public records and social media.
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Source: Your Company Website

The most likely place an adversary will begin to look is at your own company website.

Adam Meyer, chief security officer of SurfWatch Labs, explains that while there are plenty of sites that criminals can use to can show detailed information about domains, IP addresses and effective attack vectors to try, the best way for someone to find information about a particular target is by getting it directly from the source: you.

'Most corporate or company websites are a treasure trove of information attackers can use to target a specific organization,' says Meyer. 'Names of VIPs, email addresses of various people in the company, photographs, Linkedin profile links....the list goes on. And that's the easy, obvious stuff.'

Meyer reminds us that, if your company is hosting any PDFs, Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, and PowerPoint presentations for people to download, it's important to remove potential metadata from those documents that could potentially contain additional names, email addresses, usernames, or software versions of the program used to create it. All of that information can be leveraged for attacks, such as spearphishing.

'Some pretty simple Google searches (just type site:yourpublicsite.com filetype:pdf into the Google search box) can reveal much more information that you may not have been aware you were leaking,' Meyer adds.

Image Source: SurfWatch Labs

Source: Your Company Website

The most likely place an adversary will begin to look is at your own company website.

Adam Meyer, chief security officer of SurfWatch Labs, explains that while there are plenty of sites that criminals can use to can show detailed information about domains, IP addresses and effective attack vectors to try, the best way for someone to find information about a particular target is by getting it directly from the source: you.

Most corporate or company websites are a treasure trove of information attackers can use to target a specific organization, says Meyer. Names of VIPs, email addresses of various people in the company, photographs, Linkedin profile links....the list goes on. And that's the easy, obvious stuff.

Meyer reminds us that, if your company is hosting any PDFs, Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, and PowerPoint presentations for people to download, its important to remove potential metadata from those documents that could potentially contain additional names, email addresses, usernames, or software versions of the program used to create it. All of that information can be leveraged for attacks, such as spearphishing.

Some pretty simple Google searches (just type site:yourpublicsite.com filetype:pdf into the Google search box) can reveal much more information that you may not have been aware you were leaking, Meyer adds.

Image Source: SurfWatch Labs

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