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8/12/2014
03:25 PM
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas
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6 Biometric Factors That Are Working Today

From fingerprints to wearable ECG monitors, there are real options in the market that may relegate the despised password to the dustbin of history.
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Fingerprint

Craig Federighi, Apples senior vice president of software engineering, told developers at the WordWide Developer Conference this past June that since the introduction of TouchID in the iPhone in 2013, 83 percent of iPhone 5S owners use a TouchID fingerprint passcode to secure their devices. Thats up from less than half of iPhone owners who used a passcode in the pre-TouchID era.

The reason: TouchID is easy to use and impossible to forget. The results: Millions of iPhone owners (and, presumably, users of Samsung Galaxy S5, which arrived on the scene with a fingerprint scanner in April) are protected if their phones are lost or stolen, as is the personal, identifiable information contained in the devices.

With iOS8, iPhone users will have even more options for fingerprint authentication as developers roll out the first generation of third-party apps that can call out to TouchID.

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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/14/2014 | 11:33:02 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
No security is fool proof, but I'm guessing it would be easier to guess (or hack) a password  a password than replicate a fingerprint. 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 6:18:09 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I would think fingerprint scanners have vulnerabilities, it would not be difficult to replicate it and simulate the electricity of live body.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 6:14:32 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
DNA is not a bad idea that can identify the individual uniquely. The main problem for those types of solutions is the fact that we do not want to be identified uniquely for a simple reason such as logining a system.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 6:10:44 PM
Username / password old school
Thank you for sharing this article. Very informative. Username / password for credentialing will become old school very soon. We are already using picture password and two factor authentication more and more in critical systems. I am looking for those days that we can make authentication more easier for end users.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 5:41:04 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I'm going to have nightmares about that one. =)
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 5:24:19 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I'm waiting for that eyeball scanner. So done with passwords.
GonzSTL
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50%
GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 4:21:54 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
The ultimate solution - unique DNA identification. Think Gattaca.
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 4:12:20 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
good plan. Just print out this blog and message thread and put it in your wallet near your driver's license and credit cards. 
Sara Peters
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50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 4:10:36 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
If I ever have a car that requires a palm vein scanner, I'll make sure I have the appropriate literature to hand to thieves when they think about taking my hand with them, and leaving me behind.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 4:08:29 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
Truth is indeed stranger than fiction! thx for the gory details. 
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
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