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8/12/2014
03:25 PM
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas
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6 Biometric Factors That Are Working Today

From fingerprints to wearable ECG monitors, there are real options in the market that may relegate the despised password to the dustbin of history.
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Google "I hate passwords" and you'll get 3.25 million results. If that isn’t unshakeable evidence that the world is desperate for a better solution, then I will tear up all those sticky notes pasted on my laptop.

What’s the alternative? I’m putting my money on biometrics.

Yes, biometrics have been touted for a long time. But in recent years, the technology has overcome some major hurdles --  among them cost, ease of use, and access -- paving the way for some very interesting possibilities in authentication solutions that will (hopefully) relegate the despised password to the dustbin of history.

Like any security technology, there is no perfect solution. But one thing is for sure, biometrics are no longer a futuristic fantasy. There are real solutions that are working today with even more on the horizon. Let’s take a look.

At Walt Disney World, biometric measurements are taken from the fingers of guests to ensure that a ticket is used by the same person from day to day. (Image: Wikipedia)

At Walt Disney World, biometric measurements are taken from the fingers of guests to ensure that a ticket is used by the same person from day to day.

(Image: Wikipedia)

 

Marilyn has been covering technology for business, government, and consumer audiences for over 20 years. Prior to joining UBM, Marilyn worked for nine years as editorial director at TechTarget Inc., where she launched six Websites for IT managers and administrators supporting ... View Full Bio

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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/14/2014 | 11:33:02 AM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
No security is fool proof, but I'm guessing it would be easier to guess (or hack) a password  a password than replicate a fingerprint. 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 6:18:09 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I would think fingerprint scanners have vulnerabilities, it would not be difficult to replicate it and simulate the electricity of live body.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 6:14:32 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
DNA is not a bad idea that can identify the individual uniquely. The main problem for those types of solutions is the fact that we do not want to be identified uniquely for a simple reason such as logining a system.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 6:10:44 PM
Username / password old school
Thank you for sharing this article. Very informative. Username / password for credentialing will become old school very soon. We are already using picture password and two factor authentication more and more in critical systems. I am looking for those days that we can make authentication more easier for end users.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 5:41:04 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I'm going to have nightmares about that one. =)
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 5:24:19 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
I'm waiting for that eyeball scanner. So done with passwords.
GonzSTL
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GonzSTL,
User Rank: Ninja
8/12/2014 | 4:21:54 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
The ultimate solution - unique DNA identification. Think Gattaca.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 4:12:20 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
good plan. Just print out this blog and message thread and put it in your wallet near your driver's license and credit cards. 
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
8/12/2014 | 4:10:36 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
If I ever have a car that requires a palm vein scanner, I'll make sure I have the appropriate literature to hand to thieves when they think about taking my hand with them, and leaving me behind.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
8/12/2014 | 4:08:29 PM
Re: correct me if I'm wrong
Truth is indeed stranger than fiction! thx for the gory details. 
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