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6/25/2015
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5 Things You Probably Missed In The Verizon DBIR

A look at a few of the lesser-noticed but meaty nuggets in the annual Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR).
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Source: Verizon
Source: Verizon

 

If you're still digesting this year's massive Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR), you're not alone. The super-sized 2015 DBIR came with the usual popular data and rare insight on real-world incidents and breach cases, but with the addition of loads of data contributed by 70 other organizations from around the world.

Unless you've been combing the DBIR regularly since it was published in April, there's a good chance you missed a few things in it. Marc Spitler, co-author of the DBIR and senior risk analyst with Verizon, joined Dark Reading Radio yesterday and shared what may have been some of the possibly lesser-noticed or publicized nuggets from the report.

So grab your copy of the DBIR, and follow along to see what key research points you may have missed. Consider it a little summer reading for the beach.

 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

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bhalladeva
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bhalladeva,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/22/2015 | 8:14:43 AM
Re: 5 things you missed
ata and rare insight on real-world incidents and breach cases, but with the addition of loads of data contributed by 70 other organizations from around the world.

Unless you've been com
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 11:12:03 PM
Re: Mobile Malware not a significant threat
I think you forgot the word "yet."  ;)

Sure, Windows is where the action is...but that's more a function of its proliferation/market dominance and less a function of how many vulnerabilities it has.  (In 2014, for instance, several times more vulnerabilities -- and of greater severity on the whole -- were discovered in Linux, OSX, and iOS than in any Windows OS.)

Same thing if we look at mobile only, too.  iOS has way more vulnerabilities than Android, but Android is attacked way more often than iOS because there are so many more Android phones out there than iOS phones (and because it's far easier to attack people via malicious apps on Android than it is on iOS because of Apple's tight iTunes Store controls).

Anyway, it's worthwhile to keep an eye on everything across the board.  There's little telling how the results will differ five or ten years from now.
geeksonrepair
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geeksonrepair,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2015 | 4:35:04 AM
5 things you missed
I like your way of presentation.Thanks dear for such an informatic blog.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
6/26/2015 | 2:43:37 PM
Re: Mobile Malware not a significant threat
Yep, attackers always start with the easy entry point. But as Marc Spitler said, it's only a matter of time before mobile devices are a big part of the attack chain. 
LanceCottrell
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LanceCottrell,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 1:50:50 PM
Mobile Malware not a significant threat
It is nice to see this confirmation that, despite all the products and hot air from security vendors, mobile devices are not where the security breaches are happening. Windows is still by far the low hanging fruit for attackers.
Sara Peters
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Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 1:17:08 PM
relying on their customers' security
Great stuff Kelly. I love the way they put this:  "What we have here are companies ... relying on the security of their customer base. Over one half of Web app attacks came from the use of stolen credentials." So basically organizations are outsourcing security to their customers, and I suppose to the other organizations that the customers do business with.
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