Cloud

6/25/2015
04:30 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

5 Things You Probably Missed In The Verizon DBIR

A look at a few of the lesser-noticed but meaty nuggets in the annual Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR).
Previous
1 of 6
Next

Source: Verizon
Source: Verizon

 

If you're still digesting this year's massive Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR), you're not alone. The super-sized 2015 DBIR came with the usual popular data and rare insight on real-world incidents and breach cases, but with the addition of loads of data contributed by 70 other organizations from around the world.

Unless you've been combing the DBIR regularly since it was published in April, there's a good chance you missed a few things in it. Marc Spitler, co-author of the DBIR and senior risk analyst with Verizon, joined Dark Reading Radio yesterday and shared what may have been some of the possibly lesser-noticed or publicized nuggets from the report.

So grab your copy of the DBIR, and follow along to see what key research points you may have missed. Consider it a little summer reading for the beach.

 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 6
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
bhalladeva
50%
50%
bhalladeva,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/22/2015 | 8:14:43 AM
Re: 5 things you missed
ata and rare insight on real-world incidents and breach cases, but with the addition of loads of data contributed by 70 other organizations from around the world.

Unless you've been com
Joe Stanganelli
100%
0%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2015 | 11:12:03 PM
Re: Mobile Malware not a significant threat
I think you forgot the word "yet."  ;)

Sure, Windows is where the action is...but that's more a function of its proliferation/market dominance and less a function of how many vulnerabilities it has.  (In 2014, for instance, several times more vulnerabilities -- and of greater severity on the whole -- were discovered in Linux, OSX, and iOS than in any Windows OS.)

Same thing if we look at mobile only, too.  iOS has way more vulnerabilities than Android, but Android is attacked way more often than iOS because there are so many more Android phones out there than iOS phones (and because it's far easier to attack people via malicious apps on Android than it is on iOS because of Apple's tight iTunes Store controls).

Anyway, it's worthwhile to keep an eye on everything across the board.  There's little telling how the results will differ five or ten years from now.
geeksonrepair
50%
50%
geeksonrepair,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/29/2015 | 4:35:04 AM
5 things you missed
I like your way of presentation.Thanks dear for such an informatic blog.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
6/26/2015 | 2:43:37 PM
Re: Mobile Malware not a significant threat
Yep, attackers always start with the easy entry point. But as Marc Spitler said, it's only a matter of time before mobile devices are a big part of the attack chain. 
LanceCottrell
100%
0%
LanceCottrell,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 1:50:50 PM
Mobile Malware not a significant threat
It is nice to see this confirmation that, despite all the products and hot air from security vendors, mobile devices are not where the security breaches are happening. Windows is still by far the low hanging fruit for attackers.
Sara Peters
100%
0%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
6/26/2015 | 1:17:08 PM
relying on their customers' security
Great stuff Kelly. I love the way they put this:  "What we have here are companies ... relying on the security of their customer base. Over one half of Web app attacks came from the use of stolen credentials." So basically organizations are outsourcing security to their customers, and I suppose to the other organizations that the customers do business with.
Valentine's Emails Laced with Gandcrab Ransomware
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  2/14/2019
High Stress Levels Impacting CISOs Physically, Mentally
Jai Vijayan, Freelance writer,  2/14/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-8423
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-18
ZoneMinder through 1.32.3 has SQL Injection via the skins/classic/views/events.php filter[Query][terms][0][cnj] parameter.
CVE-2019-8424
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-18
ZoneMinder before 1.32.3 has SQL Injection via the ajax/status.php sort parameter.
CVE-2019-8425
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-18
includes/database.php in ZoneMinder before 1.32.3 has XSS in the construction of SQL-ERR messages.
CVE-2019-8426
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-18
skins/classic/views/controlcap.php in ZoneMinder before 1.32.3 has XSS via the newControl array, as demonstrated by the newControl[MinTiltRange] parameter.
CVE-2019-8427
PUBLISHED: 2019-02-18
daemonControl in includes/functions.php in ZoneMinder before 1.32.3 allows command injection via shell metacharacters.