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9/27/2016
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Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
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25 Security Vendors To Watch

A wave of security companies are armed with technologies to help businesses mitigate the next generation of cyberattacks. Who are these vendors and what can they offer?
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Image Source: D3Damon/iStockphoto

Image Source: D3Damon/iStockphoto

{EDITOR'S NOTE: This story has been updated to clarify that this list encompasses both emerging and established security companies.}

As cyberattacks become more complex and dangerous, security pros will be on the hunt for new technologies to protect their networks and information.

A wave of emerging and established security companies are bringing next-generation security technologies to enterprise users. These organizations have captured the industry's attention and are generating a lot of interest within the security community.

Their technologies span all aspects of the modern cybersecurity space, from mobile app security to cloud security. Their tools are aimed at helping organizations spot previously unknown cyber threats, detect attacks in real-time, and mitigate damage as soon as possible.

There are three key themes driving the cybersecurity market, says Scott Crawford, research director of the Information Security practice at 451 Research. They are: new approaches to endpoint threat prevention, security analytics, and the continued transition to the cloud.

These three trends will have a broader affect on the types of technologies offered by security vendors, as well as the tools businesses will implement and use to protect themselves from attack.

Here are some of these security companies and the technologies they offer. Some of these businesses are fairly new, but all are established and building interesting, game-changing technologies. This list is not scientific and by no means comprehensive; it's simply a sampling of vendors to watch.

 

 

Kelly Sheridan is Associate Editor at Dark Reading. She started her career in business tech journalism at Insurance & Technology and most recently reported for InformationWeek, where she covered Microsoft and business IT. Sheridan earned her BA at Villanova University. View Full Bio

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jdrosen2
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jdrosen2,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/15/2016 | 10:42:55 AM
Dont Forget - Security needs to be part of app design
While there is clearly a role for vendors whose job it is to add security services, this is a necessary capability but it is not sufficient. With software increasingly moving to SaaS, SaaS providers themselves need to be increasingly 'in the business' of security for the software they themselves offer. This means capabilities like e2e encryption, SSO and user management tools, and so on, all need to be features built into SaaS products. SaaS offerings cannot be made more secure by adding a box at the edge.
1ndian
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1ndian,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/4/2016 | 8:47:16 AM
McAfee?
McAfee is a security vendor to watch? Seriously! If anything, they are the one to be forgotten if you are serious about security!
Shantaram
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Shantaram,
User Rank: Ninja
10/4/2016 | 8:41:06 AM
Re: 192.168.0.1
I agree with you, this is very informative post!
azielke
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azielke,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/3/2016 | 9:16:14 AM
This has to be a joke
What in the world could have been the criteria for making this list?  The first vendor you listed is literally hemorrhaging as we speak.  They are laying-off employees left and right.  The founder has been marginalized so they can position the company for quick sale.  The technology is failing if you go by independent tests like NSS Labs Breach Detection where they finished a miserable last in a field they really created.  If they aren't purchased soon, they may actually disappear.

You also included a VAR, Optiv, in a list of that is supposed to be vendors.

Finally, how do you omit a huge player such as Check Point?  What they are doing with their sandboxing tech (CPU monitoring and Threat Extraction) while still extending it to the Endpoint, and addressing the biggest threat vector in the mobile space is quite groundbreaking.

Dark Reading just dropped to bottom in my list of news sources..
WilliamB078
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WilliamB078,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/29/2016 | 12:34:46 PM
A Vendor to Consider (25 Emerging Security Vendors to Watch)
This is a very informative overview. I'm curious why you did not include a company like Strike Force Technologies, Inc. who has the patents on ProtectID, GuardID, and MobileTrust. These are apps that encrypt the user's keystroke input on any device preventing its capture by malware and access to the system without dual factor out-of-band authentication. Could be the most important layers in any multi-level security defense of data. You may want to contact George Waller at Strike Force for more detail. If you have trouble making contact, please let me know. These are good products that I use.
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