Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Cloud Security

6/6/2018
08:05 AM
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
Larry Loeb
50%
50%

Microsoft's GitHub Deal: Following Developers & Security Into the Cloud

Microsoft's $7.5 billion deal for GitHub this week means different things to different people, but for Redmond, it's all about developers, cloud and securing all that data. And that's not a bad thing.

It's been widely disseminated that GitHub, the most popular repository of open source software, has been sold to Microsoft for about $7.5 billion. There have been wildly disparate reactions to that news among developers that use it.

One narrative percolating around is that Microsoft is no longer the bully that it once was when it comes to open source -- remember when ex-CEO Steve Ballmer called Linux "a cancer." This view holds that current CEO Satya Nadella understands and embraces open source, and that he wants to ensure that GitHub survives and prospers. (See Unknown Document 743597.)

Since Microsoft has become the largest user on GitHub in the last few years, there is some credence to this.

But developers also have a long memory. They do not forget what Microsoft has done in the past to be predominant, or how Redmond crushed competitors without mercy.

Some developers worry about a large corporation being able to track their development without hinderance, wondering if they will use their newfound omniscience on GitHub to eliminate competition when it arises.

There is a clash of cultures going on here.

Independence-minded developers do not innately trust Microsoft to protect their interests. But consider the realities of the situation. GitHub has within the last six months lost top management. The developers living there wrote an open letter in 2016 to management complaining about how things were run. The site may be romanticized now into some unicorn-like playground, but there have been real and serious problems behind the scenes.

GitHub has had a rough time moving towards economic stability and, despite its popularity, being able to support the company, as well as the community around it. It needed a major, long-term partner to calm the seas it faces.

There is significant competition in their space, as well.

All the hand-wringing ignores what seems to be the core issue in this: Microsoft wants access to developers. Developers will drive future software, whether that's in developing applications or creating tools to protect those apps, whether on-premises or out in the cloud.

Microsoft doesn't have what Apple has -- the leverage of committed users over developers. It envies Apple's strategic position with developers. So, it has bought a way to talk to them in order to present its own story. It's underappreciated by most how much GitHub is also a developer socialization network besides being a repository.


Now entering its fifth year, the 2020 Vision Executive Summit is an exclusive meeting of global CSP executives focused on navigating the disruptive forces at work in telecom today. Join us in Lisbon on December 4-6 to meet with fellow experts as we define the future of next-gen communications and how to make it profitable.

MSFT has realized -- finally -- that software is now cloud-based both in scope and development, not just tool-based. This acquisition fits with a strategy of moving things to where they are heading, not where they were. This goes for the security tools that protect all this data as well.

Microsoft no doubt realizes the extreme pressure it now faces in acting as the steward of GitHub. If it messes up, the mob will be waiting with pitchforks and torches to kill the monster. The company has the right to do it, but Redmond will lose the developers they want to influence.

There's something else for rabid GitHubbers to consider. What if it had been Oracle that bought the community -- just to mess with all the Java stuff on it?

Let that idea bump around for a little before you scream about MSFT.

Related posts:

— Larry Loeb has written for many of the last century's major "dead tree" computer magazines, having been, among other things, a consulting editor for BYTE magazine and senior editor for the launch of WebWeek.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Pen Testers Who Got Arrested Doing Their Jobs Tell All
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/5/2020
Researcher Finds New Office Macro Attacks for MacOS
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  8/7/2020
A Patriotic Solution to the Cybersecurity Skills Shortage
Adam Benson, Senior VP, Vrge Strategies,  8/3/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
This special report takes a look at how enterprises are using threat intelligence, as well as emerging best practices for integrating threat intel into security operations and incident response. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-12777
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-10
A function in Combodo iTop contains a vulnerability of Broken Access Control, which allows unauthorized attacker to inject command and disclose system information.
CVE-2020-12778
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-10
Combodo iTop does not validate inputted parameters, attackers can inject malicious commands and launch XSS attack.
CVE-2020-12779
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-10
Combodo iTop contains a stored Cross-site Scripting vulnerability, which can be attacked by uploading file with malicious script.
CVE-2020-12780
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-10
A security misconfiguration exists in Combodo iTop, which can expose sensitive information.
CVE-2020-12781
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-10
Combodo iTop contains a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability, attackers can execute specific commands via malicious site request forgery.