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How Top Security Execs are Doing More with Less

Even the largest corporations aren't immune to the cybersecurity skills gap – an inside look at how they are coping and adjusting.

You might think the largest US corporations have the least trouble attracting new cybersecurity talent, but that's not necessarily the case. Many millennials are more interested in start-ups and new companies rather than the traditional Fortune 100/1000, which they may not think are as tech-savvy or as bleeding edge as a new firm.

Security executives from three tech-savvy major corporations - Coca-Cola, Ford Motor Co., and Microsoft - next month at Interop ITX in Las Vegas, will share their firsthand experience and insight on how they are managing and coping with the cybersecurity skills shortage. Like small- and midsized businesses, these major corporations also find themselves doing more with less at a time when the job openings exponentially outnumber the candidates in the talent pool. 

[Check out the two-day Dark Reading Cybersecurity Crash Course at Interop ITX, May 15 & 16, where Dark Reading editors and some of the industry's top cybersecurity experts will share the latest data security trends and best practices.]

Katherine Fithen, chief privacy officer and director of Global IT Governance & Compliance for The Coca-Cola Company; Rob Duhart, Ford Motor Company's Big Data Analytics Security Lead, Data Supply Chain, EEIT; and Ann Johnson, vice president of the Enterprise Cybersecurity Group at Microsoft, will participate in a panel discussion called "Surviving The Security Skills Shortage" on Wed., May 17, 11:40am PT at Interop ITX.

The panel will discuss their recruiting efforts to attract new and young security talent, as well as how they retain those elusive top performers. Retraining their existing IT and security teams also is a big part of the strategy today, especially as skillsets must quickly evolve with rapid-fire technology and threat changes. The security execs also will give advice on what works and what doesn't, as well as what they consider the hottest and most in-demand security skills today.

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