Careers & People

12/22/2017
09:00 AM
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CISO Holiday Miracle Wish List

If CISOs could make a wish to solve a problem, these would be among the top choices.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock (C) ra2 studio

Image Source: Adobe Stock ra2 studio

With the holiday season in full swing, this is the time of year that has people thinking of happy miracles. Which got us at Dark Reading pondering: if CISOs had their pick of career miracles this holiday season and New Year, what would their miracle be? Based on our engagement with security practitioners, data from recent surveys and opinions from industry pundits, here are our best guesses.

 

Ericka Chickowski specializes in coverage of information technology and business innovation. She has focused on information security for the better part of a decade and regularly writes about the security industry as a contributor to Dark Reading.  View Full Bio

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cybersavior
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cybersavior,
User Rank: Strategist
12/27/2017 | 11:43:39 AM
The big chair
That's why the big "top security person" chair is so precarious.  "Career Is Soon Over" (CISO), as they say.  It's true.  It is always the hot seat when you are accountable to control and protect against the unknown with limited resources and finite labor.  One unpatched system, one rouge insider and you're toast.

Oh and I disliked the 6-page slideshow format.  I realize that it gets the host exponential opportunities to display ads and content but the consumer experience is annoying. 
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