Careers & People

7/31/2018
12:00 PM
Kelly Sheridan
Kelly Sheridan
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
LinkedIn
Google+
RSS
E-Mail

10 More Women in Security You May Not Know But Should

The second installment in a series highlighting women who are driving change in cybersecurity but may not be on your radar - yet.
10 of 11

Katie Burnell
Insider Threat Analyst (EMEA), Dtex Systems
When Katie Burnell went to work for the Bank of England as a data processor, she didn't intend to switch career paths into cybersecurity. She was on the digital media team when she learned the bank was creating an IT security department. As she moved up through the ranks, Burnell helped build the bank's first security operations center and insider threat capability, eventually landing a role as cyber investigator.
Now she works as an insider threat analyst at Dtex, where she analyzes user activity, conducts threat assessments, and communicates security risks to a pool of clients that includes large global financial institutions, power suppliers, and government agencies.
As an expert threat analyst, Burnell splits her time between US-based large financial institutions and Dtex's EMEA customer base. She also fulfills a role in the EMEA pre-sales strategy, meeting with prospective customers, providing strategic consultations, and representing Dtex at partner events. On top of that, Burnell helps develop the 'Dtex Insider Threat Intelligence Report' and works with other teams to advance Dtex technology and expertise in detecting insider threats. Her time with the Bank of England helped establish her skills in detecting insider threats, she says, and her interest and qualifications in open source intelligence (OSINT) helped grow them.
Burnell says her experience as a young woman in cybersecurity has been challenging, but that hasn't stopped her from sharing her experience and knowledge. She has spoken at industry events in the past, and one of her career goals is to present at Black Hat, which she first attended in 2016 and was inspired by the speakers' knowledge and variety of presentation styles and topic areas.
Burnell's overarching goal is to continue sharing her knowledge and hands-on experience 'of the often ugly truths, unspoken trends, and 'real' issues that companies face, and to make this relatable to businesses of all sizes, industries, budgets, and cybersecurity maturity levels,' she says.
Burnell is a qualified OSINT practitioner, certified 'human hacker,' Maltego CTF champion, and advocate for women in cybersecurity.

Katie Burnell

Insider Threat Analyst (EMEA), Dtex Systems

When Katie Burnell went to work for the Bank of England as a data processor, she didn't intend to switch career paths into cybersecurity. She was on the digital media team when she learned the bank was creating an IT security department. As she moved up through the ranks, Burnell helped build the bank's first security operations center and insider threat capability, eventually landing a role as cyber investigator.

Now she works as an insider threat analyst at Dtex, where she analyzes user activity, conducts threat assessments, and communicates security risks to a pool of clients that includes large global financial institutions, power suppliers, and government agencies.

As an expert threat analyst, Burnell splits her time between US-based large financial institutions and Dtex's EMEA customer base. She also fulfills a role in the EMEA pre-sales strategy, meeting with prospective customers, providing strategic consultations, and representing Dtex at partner events. On top of that, Burnell helps develop the "Dtex Insider Threat Intelligence Report" and works with other teams to advance Dtex technology and expertise in detecting insider threats. Her time with the Bank of England helped establish her skills in detecting insider threats, she says, and her interest and qualifications in open source intelligence (OSINT) helped grow them.

Burnell says her experience as a young woman in cybersecurity has been challenging, but that hasn't stopped her from sharing her experience and knowledge. She has spoken at industry events in the past, and one of her career goals is to present at Black Hat, which she first attended in 2016 and was inspired by the speakers' knowledge and variety of presentation styles and topic areas.

Burnell's overarching goal is to continue sharing her knowledge and hands-on experience "of the often ugly truths, unspoken trends, and 'real' issues that companies face, and to make this relatable to businesses of all sizes, industries, budgets, and cybersecurity maturity levels," she says.

Burnell is a qualified OSINT practitioner, certified "human hacker," Maltego CTF champion, and advocate for women in cybersecurity.

10 of 11
Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
SaulMorris
50%
50%
SaulMorris,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2018 | 7:46:18 AM
Re: Jamie Tomasello
i agree
gif-washco
50%
50%
gif-washco,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/17/2018 | 11:13:01 AM
Extroverts?
I have worked with and reported to female coworkers and leaders. The leaders in this article seem to have a common trait of being extroverts, no difference in comparison to their male counterparts. However, a lot of unsung female heros are not extroverts and work diligiently with their team members and customers. They do not want publicity. To me, they are also leaders...

 
aumickmanuela
100%
0%
aumickmanuela,
User Rank: Strategist
8/7/2018 | 4:42:15 AM
Jamie Tomasello
I don't know that in this sphere are working pretty girls, like this. This article is very interesting for me. Jamie Tomasello has interesting experience and give me good advices in my work!
Crowdsourced vs. Traditional Pen Testing
Alex Haynes, Chief Information Security Officer, CDL,  3/19/2019
BEC Scammer Pleads Guilty
Dark Reading Staff 3/20/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
Organizations are responding to new threats with new processes for detecting and mitigating them. Here's a look at how the discipline of incident response is evolving.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-20031
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
A Denial of Service vulnerability related to preemptive item deletion in lmgrd and vendor daemon components of FlexNet Publisher version 11.16.1.0 and earlier allows a remote attacker to send a combination of messages to lmgrd or the vendor daemon, causing the heartbeat between lmgrd and the vendor ...
CVE-2018-20032
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
A Denial of Service vulnerability related to message decoding in lmgrd and vendor daemon components of FlexNet Publisher version 11.16.1.0 and earlier allows a remote attacker to send a combination of messages to lmgrd or the vendor daemon, causing the heartbeat between lmgrd and the vendor daemon t...
CVE-2018-20034
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
A Denial of Service vulnerability related to adding an item to a list in lmgrd and vendor daemon components of FlexNet Publisher version 11.16.1.0 and earlier allows a remote attacker to send a combination of messages to lmgrd or the vendor daemon, causing the heartbeat between lmgrd and the vendor ...
CVE-2019-3855
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
An integer overflow flaw which could lead to an out of bounds write was discovered in libssh2 before 1.8.1 in the way packets are read from the server. A remote attacker who compromises a SSH server may be able to execute code on the client system when a user connects to the server.
CVE-2019-3858
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-21
An out of bounds read flaw was discovered in libssh2 before 1.8.1 when a specially crafted SFTP packet is received from the server. A remote attacker who compromises a SSH server may be able to cause a Denial of Service or read data in the client memory.