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Attacks/Breaches

Breach Awareness Made Easy

What if companies had to disclose breach history in the same way food companies display nutritional information?

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ODA155
ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2014 | 3:12:02 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
I think you're looking for a simple solution to a very complicated problem. So, my question, who explains to the consumer what a CrossSite Scripting attack is... DDoS or SQL Injection?

Instead, I would recommend something like this, although government sponsored. If you want to get people attention they will need to know what you're talking about and if you search this DB you will see the shock value it could have if more people (consumers) were aware of its existance.

 

Chronology of Data Breaches Security Breaches 2005 - Present

https://www.privacyrights.org/data-breach

 
Sara Peters
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
10/6/2014 | 2:09:01 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
@Marilyn  Definitely hard to argue against more transparency when it comes to breaches. One thing that's going to take some time to do, though, is to educate the general public.so that they'd actually understand what the heck the data meant. Maybe things like "cross-site scripting vulnerabilities" on an app security box would only matter to IT people anyway. But a breach disclosure box for the general public would have to be a bit simpler.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2014 | 1:54:21 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
That appsec lable, is cool, isn't it? Would be a litte trick to implemment for web apps, to be sure. But it's hard to argue against the idea of more transparency when it comes to breach disclosure.... 
Sara Peters
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
10/6/2014 | 12:47:21 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
@Marilyn  Ooo I like the OWASP version with app security too. The tricky thing with doing it for Web apps is that you could only focus on the app and not the implementation on the Website, since looking for vulnerabilities on someone else's site is illegal without permission.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/29/2014 | 8:02:03 AM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
Agreed, Robert. More so, I think a public disclosure of breach history would put security right where it belongs -- on the front burner of the C-suite which sould give security teams much more clout and visibility for getting the resources they need to be proactive.
Robert McDougal
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
9/28/2014 | 1:29:52 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
Not only would it make the information more digestable and understandable for consumers, it would additionally drive business away from the poorest performers and shepard business to the most secure companies.   I like it.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/26/2014 | 4:27:01 PM
Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
This isn't totally analagous but Jeff Williams creator of the OWASP Top 10 came up with a similar idea for application security. I'm sure something similar could come be fashioned for data breach disclosure. Check it out: 

on security. Take a look 

 
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