Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Black Hat Asia
May 10-13, 2022
Hybrid/Marina Bay Sands, Singapore
Black Hat USA
August 6-11, 2022
Las Vegas, NV, USA
Black Hat Europe
December 5-8, 2022
London
End of Bibblio RCM includes -->
6/6/2018
12:00 PM
Nico Fischbach, CTO of Forcepoint
Nico Fischbach, CTO of Forcepoint
Event Updates

Restoring Business Velocity and Trust in Users with Risk-Adaptive Protection

A paradigm shift in thinking is needed for the cybersecurity industry.

A paradigm shift in thinking is needed for the cybersecurity industry. Security teams are dealing with thousands of alerts a day, there is a never-ending barrage of threats and vulnerabilities currently hidden that can go live at any moment. Today, the role of the security teams dealing with alerts has become one of trying to find the needle in a haystack. In this model, it’s no surprise that it can take weeks, months or even years to uncover a breach.

A new approach to security is needed - today. One that doesn’t solely rely on legacy data protection solutions built on static policies and a culture of “no” that is only successful at creating friction, frustrating users and slowing down the enterprise.

There are two ways to achieve this goal. The first is to build a better needle-finding algorithm while the second is to just get rid of the hay.

And this all starts with understanding who is accessing your data. Shifting to a human-centric approach to cybersecurity recognizes that people follow an identifiable work routine to get their job done. Understanding their baseline “normal” behavior helps security teams quickly spot and investigate anomalies -- like the exfiltration or printing of a massive amount of customer data. This is a new category of cybersecurity that Forcepoint calls Risk-Adaptive Protection.

Risk-Adaptive Protection focuses on how, when and why people interact with critical data, correlating behavior with the context of user activities to view risk holistically. And, instead of locking down productivity, Risk-Adaptive Protection gives users more freedom by enforcing policies that are unique to the user and proportionally applied only when needed.

With this approach, continuous monitoring and human-centric behavior analytics take center stage, enabling security teams to see and organize risk as it occurs, and in real-time manage it more intelligently at the end-user level. With the ability to manage security protocols down to the individual, organizations can customize security response according to the level of risk the company is willing to accept.

In many ways, this same principle is used as part of the TSA PreCheck program. Prior to TSA PreCheck, all U.S. airline passengers were treated as potential threats and subjected to in-depth security review in order to access their gate of travel. TSA recognized most travelers are not in fact threats. This led to the TSA PreCheck program, creating a new class of “known travelers” that get a simpler, faster screening process in exchange for providing detailed background information. This information helps TSA better understand the individual traveler and establishes a level of trust that allows for the expedited screening process.

Yes. You read that correctly. Trust in the individual as it relates to security – and reducing security friction at same time. The threats aren’t going to slow down. And, the attackers are coming through the door. Rethinking cybersecurity strategy across the enterprise is now a mandate from executive leaders and the board of directors and on down.

Risk-Adaptive Protection is a strategic path forward.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
//Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
ConwayK9781
ConwayK9781,
User Rank: Strategist
6/25/2018 | 8:02:45 AM
You lost me at "[t]rust in the individual as it relates to security..."
I think the main problem that I have with this analogy is that with the TSA example, no one is accidentally a terrorist on an airplane.  No one accidentally takes flying lessons, accidentally sneaks a weapon of some sort onto a plane, accidentally hijacks the plane and works themselves into the cockpit, and then accidentally slams the plane into a building.  "Whoops, I meant to go out and buy dinner, not become a hardcore terrorist!"

The users on the network, however, don't require malice to become a security threat.  They just require a lack of understanding and a degree of gullibility.  Anyone that's ever worked in any business at all (whether IT/IS related or not) can tell you with absolute certainty that at every single company they've worked at these kinds of people exist.  With the TSA they assume people aren't malicious, with the network you have to assume they are not malicious AND they are well informed on matters that are completely unrelated to their job.

That just seems like a bad assumption to me.
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
How Machine Learning, AI & Deep Learning Improve Cybersecurity
Machine intelligence is influencing all aspects of cybersecurity. Organizations are implementing AI-based security to analyze event data using ML models that identify attack patterns and increase automation. Before security teams can take advantage of AI and ML tools, they need to know what is possible. This report covers: -How to assess the vendor's AI/ML claims -Defining success criteria for AI/ML implementations -Challenges when implementing AI
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-27854
PUBLISHED: 2022-09-27
Layer 2 network filtering capabilities such as IPv6 RA guard can be bypassed using combinations of VLAN 0 headers, LLC/SNAP headers, and converting frames from Ethernet to Wifi and its reverse.
CVE-2021-27861
PUBLISHED: 2022-09-27
Layer 2 network filtering capabilities such as IPv6 RA guard can be bypassed using LLC/SNAP headers with invalid length (and optionally VLAN0 headers)
CVE-2021-27862
PUBLISHED: 2022-09-27
Layer 2 network filtering capabilities such as IPv6 RA guard can be bypassed using LLC/SNAP headers with invalid length and Ethernet to Wifi frame conversion (and optionally VLAN0 headers).
CVE-2021-27853
PUBLISHED: 2022-09-27
Layer 2 network filtering capabilities such as IPv6 RA guard or ARP inspection can be bypassed using combinations of VLAN 0 headers and LLC/SNAP headers.
CVE-2022-39258
PUBLISHED: 2022-09-27
mailcow is a mailserver suite. A vulnerability innversions prior to 2022-09 allows an attacker to craft a custom Swagger API template to spoof Authorize links. This could redirect a victim to an attacker controller place to steal Swagger authorization credentials or create a phishing page to steal o...