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 Adam Ely
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Profile of Adam Ely

COO, Bluebox
News & Commentary Posts: 26

Adam Ely is the founder and COO of Bluebox. Prior to this role, Adam was the CISO of the Heroku business unit at Salesforce where he was responsible for application security, security operations, compliance, and external security relations. Prior to Salesforce, Adam led security and compliance at TiVo and held various security leadership roles within The Walt Disney Company where he was responsible for security operations and application security of Walt Disney web properties including ABC.com, ESPN.com, and Disney.com.

Articles by Adam Ely

3 Startups To See At RSA

2/14/2011
Over the past few months I've used my highly unscientific methods to identify new security startups I believe are worth watching over the next 12 months. These companies are solving problems for enterprises in various spaces. Each is worth reaching out to if you are attending RSA or BSides in San Francisco this week.

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'Tis Attack Season: 5 Ways To Fight Back

12/22/2010
For most of us, it's time for sleeping in, spending time with family, and ignoring e-mail. For criminals, it's time to go to work. Scammers are looking to exploit e-card traffic, sales promotions, and the general jolliness of Internet users. What better time to attack unwatched enterprise systems, siphon out data, and dig deeper into networks?

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Who's Driving Your Security Bus?

10/5/2010
When did vendors begin setting our security priorities? I asked myself this question recently while at dinner with three friends representing two security vendors. This was a personal event, not business, and as is often the case, I was the only person from the enterprise side of the industry. You can imagine the conversation.

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The Browser As Attack Vector

8/5/2010
Beginning with the Web 2.0 boom and accelerating with today's popular SaaS model, new attack techniques are exploiting browser flaws and leading to the compromise of data.

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The Browser As Attack Vector

8/5/2010
Beginning with the Web 2.0 boom and accelerating with today's popular SaaS model, new attack techniques are exploiting browser flaws and leading to the compromise of data.

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Hackers Unite!

7/20/2010
I'm like the proverbial kid in a candy store. This my favorite time of year. Between Black Hat, Defcon, and BSides, you have feds, criminals, security experts, reporters, and everyone in between congregating in the city of sin. What's not to like? Here's a rundown of these events, my picks for talks not to be missed, and an invitation.

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Malware's New Vehicle

3/3/2010
Malware has been around for years, but most IT pros think about it only when a family member calls for computer help. Well, one theme of RSA is that we're all going to have to pay closer attention.

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My Hat Is Blue

10/22/2009
For the past two days I have been back in Seattle. It was almost two years ago I left the city, and was not sure when I'd get a chance to return. Microsoft's BlueHat security conference was a great reason to come back to my favorite rainy city. What is BlueHat?

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Ethics, Integrity, and Playing Nice

9/11/2009
As security professionals we are paid to know how to do bad things. We must know how to do these bad things in order to defend from bad people. What separates us from the criminals is our integrity. We hack for the good of humanity.

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COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/21/2020
Cybersecurity Bounces Back, but Talent Still Absent
Simone Petrella, Chief Executive Officer, CyberVista,  9/16/2020
Meet the Computer Scientist Who Helped Push for Paper Ballots
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/16/2020
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CVE-2020-6564
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Inappropriate implementation in permissions in Google Chrome prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to spoof the contents of a permission dialog via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6565
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Inappropriate implementation in Omnibox in Google Chrome on iOS prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to spoof the contents of the Omnibox (URL bar) via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6566
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Insufficient policy enforcement in media in Google Chrome prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to leak cross-origin data via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6567
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Insufficient validation of untrusted input in command line handling in Google Chrome on Windows prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to bypass navigation restrictions via a crafted HTML page.
CVE-2020-6568
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-21
Insufficient policy enforcement in intent handling in Google Chrome on Android prior to 85.0.4183.83 allowed a remote attacker to bypass navigation restrictions via a crafted HTML page.