Author

 Larry Greenemeier

Profile of Larry Greenemeier

News & Commentary Posts: 58
Articles by Larry Greenemeier

Forget Security 3.0. What Will Security 4.0 Look Like?

6/4/2007
Believe it or not, people already are starting to ask this question as it becomes painfully obvious that today's teens, whose dexterous thumbs have grown up tapping away on cell phone keypads as they check out the latest action on MySpace or YouTube, will be part of the workforce before you know it.

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Data Security: You're Not Learning From Others' Mistakes

5/29/2007
As I was catching up on some e-mail last night, I came across a message that's become all too familiar to me. It was textbook: A company was apologizing that one of its laptops had been stolen and that the laptop contained customer account and credit card information. A real yawner, until I considered that this e-mail was delivered to my personal e-mail account and that it was my customer account and credit card info that may have been compromised. Companies just aren't getting the messag

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A Day In The Life Of Cigna's CISO: 7 Things You Didn't Know

5/11/2007
I recently visited Cigna chief information security officer Craig Shumard at his company's offices in suburban Connecticut. On a clear, sunny day that slowly melted away the last vestiges of winter -- mostly scattered mounds of snow encrusted with rock and dirt -- across the rolling hills of the employee benefits provider's campus, I got to see firsthand how the security chief at a big-time company operates and interacts with his staff. It was impressive, to say the least.

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Besieged E-Gold Founder Claims (Not Unconvincingly) To Be Victim Of A Fed Vendetta

5/2/2007
Bloggers live for feedback to their controversial postings and in this regard, my entry earlier this week about a federal grand jury's decision late last week to indict E Gold Ltd, Gold & Silver Reserve Inc., and the owners of these digital currency businesses on charges of money laundering, conspiracy, and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business did not disappoint. The following day, I recei

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E-Gold's Chairman Spoke Out Against Cybercrime, Until He Got Caught

4/30/2007
I read with great interest about a Washington, D.C., federal grand jury's decision late last week to indict E Gold Ltd, Gold & Silver Reserve Inc., and the owners of these digital currency businesses on charges of money laundering, conspiracy, and operating an unlicensed money transmitting business. I recently served on a grand jury in Brooklyn, so I know the joke about being able to indict a ham sandwich to

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7 Security Myths Busted

4/12/2007
In the coming weeks, expect to see several stories in InformationWeek and at InformationWeek.com that explain and analyze the role that a chief information security officer has come to play within companies. This coverage will include profiles of some of the industry's leading security chiefs who share their experiences, expertise, and frustrations while protecting corporate and customer data in an increasingly

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When The 2 Billionth Customer Record Is Stolen, Insiders Will Be The Most Guilty

3/30/2007
While I was researching my next story on the danger that employees, contractors, and business partners (i.e., insiders) can place on the security of corporate data, a friend of mine sent me an interesting study that noted, among several other fascinating data points, that last year personal records were compromised at a rate of 5.8 million per month. At this rate, by the end of the year more than 2 billion records

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Buy This Shampoo Or You'll Never See Your Data Again

2/8/2007
While researching the hacker economy for Monday's InformationWeek lead feature story, I came across a lot of clever and devious tricks that cybercriminals use to lie, cheat, and steal their way through life. But none was as bizarre as a cyberransom scam I came across in my reporting. If you haven't had your daily dose of weird today, keep reading.

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A Walk Through Cybercrime's Underworld

2/2/2007
What's a piece of data worth? It's not too hard to find out. Just go to one of the dozens of online marketplaces where stolen credit card numbers, PINs, and Social Security numbers can be purchased--individually or in bundles--starting at just a few dollars. A few dollars is all that's needed to ruin someone's credit rating, drive up their debt, and make them question whether to trust you with their information next time.

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Anatomy Of A Phishing Scam

10/26/2006
The invention of the phishing scam marked the first time in the history of computer viruses and malware that people could make serious money off of security attacks. Think it's easy to launch a phishing scam? It's not. But there's a big-time payoff for those who can successfully navigate through the following steps, as laid out by Andrew Klein, Everdream's director of product marketing.

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Quick, Encrypt Everything!

9/22/2006
On the surface, it seems like a good idea. Convert all your corporate information into a form unreadable by anyone except the intended recipient. Very straightforward and not terribly difficult to do. But there's a dark side to encryption. Just like anesthesiologists like to joke that putting you under is free, it's waking you up that costs so much money, decrypting your data is the part of the process where things get hairy. In this era of epidemically stolen and lost laptops and mobile devices

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Post 9/11: Five Years Of IT Promise And Failure

9/8/2006
Sept. 11, 2001, spurred IT innovation and integration like no other event in history. Driven by fear, defiance, and inspiration, industry and government quickly promised to correct the conditions--including siloed data repositories, incompatible communications systems, and lax security practices--that allowed the terrorist attacks to be executed with such deadly precision. How far have we come in five years? Let's put it this way: We've got a long way to go.

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Black Hat: How's Your Security Crystal Ball Looking?

8/4/2006
Perhaps the best reason to attend Black Hat is the opportunity to see what's on the horizon when it comes to security. It's human nature to want to know things your colleagues don't. It gives people a reason to listen to you and helps you sound smart. In the spirit of water-cooler chat dominance, here are three security issues I observed at Black Hat that probably won't send your security staff scurrying for answers tomorrow, but will sooner rather than later have a significant impact on the sec

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Network Security Courtesy Of A Fist Full Of Chips

7/25/2006
Why pay tens of thousands of dollars on a firewall or other network security device when you can get comparable protection from one at a fraction of the cost? That's the promise behind security system-on-chip technology that embeds virtual private network, firewall, and other capabilities into network appliances at the silicon level, eliminating the need for the software and integrated circu

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Our Data Isn't Secure, So What Are We Going To Do About It?

6/30/2006
One of the great things about my job is that there's never a shortage of things to do. This is especially the case when it comes to covering data security. Before the ink is dry on one story about a stolen laptop or breached database, I find another one to cover. But this troubling trend isn't just a case of "good-for-me-bad-for-you." I, too, have been ensnared in the web of identity theft and data breaches. Where is all this going, and what have we learned?

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5 Open-Source Security Tools For Your Arsenal

6/9/2006
In the movies, hacking is glamorous. A few lines of code, a little pen testing, and you're in. You don't need to cast Angelina Jolie (Hackers) or Hugh Jackman (Swordfish) to portray hacking as it truly is: a game of patience and persistence that's mostly trial and error, heavy emphasis on the "error." Assuming no prior knowledge of a system an attacker seeks to penetrate, hacking is done in stages. The attacker is a digital gumshoe pounding the electronic pavement in search of any

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Stolen Data: Trouble's Just A Click Away If You Know Where To Look

5/25/2006
If news of the recent theft of a Veterans Affairs laptop containing records of 26.5 million vets and their spouses has you feeling insecure, here's something you'll really like: marketplaces where this stolen information can be bought and sold so that criminals can not only steal your identity, but gain access to all that your identity provides. While these marketplaces aren't new, I recently sat down with a

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PC Theft's Darwin Awards

5/17/2006
All you fans of the Darwin Awards will like this. Just as the Darwins "salute the improvement of the human genome by honoring those who remove themselves from it in really stupid ways," a company called Absolute Software recently shared some of the more interesting cases of computer theft and recovery it has encountered over the past year.

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Do Your Passwords Pass Microsoft's Test?

4/25/2006
There's a scene in the movie Spaceballs when King Roland, having given in to Dark Helmet's threats, tells him that the combination to his planet's "air shield" is 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Exasperated, Dark Helmet responds, "That's the stupidest combination I've ever heard in my life! The kind of thing an idiot would have on his luggage!" Moments later, we learn that this is indeed the combination to the evil President Skroob's luggage. At this point, we're pretty sure that Lone Starr and the rest o

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Software Security Groupies Kiss And Tell

4/13/2006
Bet you didn't know that software companies, like rock stars, have groupies. Rock star groupies know every word to every one of their favorite band's songs, and they know how to wrangle backstage passes that make them privy to the band's inner workings. In my April 17 article on software companies and the security researcher groupies who love them, I spin a yarn about several instances where researchers found their way onto the proverbial tour bus. Do the people in charge of IT security really w

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Check Point Made The Right Move In Dropping Sourcefire Bid

3/30/2006
The fastest way to obscurity in the security market is to worry about yesterday's problems. Check Point Software Technologies is looking to put its aborted bid to buy Sourcefire behind it. Once the deal came under the scrutiny of the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, both companies would have been wrapped up in red tape for months. Unacceptable in the fast-moving world of IT security.

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Finger-Pointing Abounds As Customers Are Fleeced

3/21/2006
In June, Frank Robertson could be sentenced to spend the next 15 years in a New Jersey state prison as punishment for his role in one of the biggest payment-card frauds pulled off to date. Robertson and 13 other men were arrested in December in connection with a heist that stretches across the U.S. and into Eastern Europe, with more than $3 million in goods stolen along the way, mostly high-end electronics. The repercussions of this crime will ripple throughout the financial services, retail, an

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The War On Malware Goes Mobile

3/10/2006
Remember the good old days, when your only concern about issuing and managing cell phones and PDAs was that someone would leave theirs in a taxi or on an airplane? Now viruses and mobile malware have reared their ugly heads, further convincing IT departments that BlackBerrys, cell phones, laptops, and PDAs must be locked down with as much vigor as back-end systems. The result is a slew of mobile data security options that include mobile encryption and even a kill switch for data should it fall i

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If You Can't Trust Your Bank, Who Can You Trust?

3/9/2006
You're traveling out of the country, for business or on vacation, and you decide it's time for lunch. You're about to hail a taxi to take you to that fantastic café you passed by this morning, but first you figure you might was well get some cash. No problem, there's even a branch of your local bank nearby. Well, maybe there is a problem. The ATM refuses to give you any money, informing you that your transaction cannot be completed and you should call your bank. You pull out your cell phone

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Was Gartner The IDS Market's Terminator?

2/6/2006
Nearly three years after contributing to a report that has been accused of sounding the death knell for the intrusion-detection system, or IDS, technology market, a former Gartner analyst stands by his convictions. While I was reporting this week's InformationWeek cover story, "Credibility of Analysts," I had asked a number of sources if they could remember a time when an analyst firm had created a stir by m

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Can StopBadware Save The Universe From ... 'Badware'?

1/27/2006
It's debatable whether StopBadware.org's education campaign against deceptive adware, spyware, and other malware will provide much of a counterweight against the growth of the lucrative adware/spyware industry, given that this software is often installed without the user's knowledge and is difficult to remove. Launched this week, this group of tech industry leaders, academics, and consumer advocates certainly

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Single Sign-On Is A Myth

1/24/2006
The brass ring in identity management is to create one universal user identity per employee, contractor, or business partner that can be managed centrally and recognized by all applications, operating systems, and databases that a user encounters. But it's a fool's gold for companies to think that they can achieve "single sign-on" capabilities for their users, Dennis Brixius, the McGraw-Hill Cos. VP and chief security officer, said Tuesday at an identity-management seminar hosted by Oracle. Give

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Paint Another Target On Cisco As Enterprise VoIP Grows

1/20/2006
Cisco's revelation Wednesday of two security alerts and fixes for CallManager, the software-based call-processing component of its IP communications technology, could have washed waves of despair over the budding voice-over-IP market. That is, if it had been the first whiff of security trouble for VoIP. The ability to launch denial-of-service attacks against VoIP networks, Cisco VoIP networks in particular, is nothing new. The real concern is holding the line against damage inflicted by VoIP att

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Holy_father Delivers Rootkits To The Masses

1/17/2006
The futility of today's model for antivirus protection is fairly obvious. Plug one hole in the dike and another will sprout. Pretty soon, you're running out of fingers and toes to hold back the flood. It gets worse. Attackers without the skill to create their own malicious hacks can outsource their dirty business to others who will write the code for them and then offer services that keep these rootkits from being detected. It's the virtual version of Spy vs. Spy, with many black hats claiming t

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Social Security Numbers On The Justice Department's Web Site Could Lead To Identity Theft

12/23/2005
I know a little something about identity theft, having spent the past four months trying to convince my bank that nearly $800 in purchases at Toy 'R' Us allegedly made using my Visa debit card were fraudulent. So when I opened an E-mail Monday morning that described an InformationWeek reader's efforts to alert the Justice Department that its Web site was revealing Social Security numbers on court docum

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Security Is Not Insurance

12/14/2005
What's the hardest part of a chief security officer's job? Evaluating new technologies? Establishing policies for users to follow? Actually, it's more political than that, Jim Routh, chief security officer of Depository Trust & Clearing Corp., said during an Interop presentation Tuesday. "The hardest part of a CSO's job is influencing information security and practices that will be implemented throughout an organization," he said. "It's a delicate process, particularly when you're asking an IT o

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Security's Sisyphean Situation

11/23/2005
Did you hear that? It's the sound of your network and applications being attacked. Hear that? It just happened again. What's worse, the nature of these attacks is changing. Gone are the good old days of simply having your Web site defaced, your e-mail corrupted by indiscriminant worms, and your networks flooded by brute-force denial-of-service attacks. Sure, you'll see plenty of those in 2006, but what you should really be worried about are the attacks you can't see. Where did it all go wrong? L

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Conspiracy Theory: Michael Lynn Negotiates Corner Office, Reserved Parking Space With Juniper

11/7/2005
Anyone predicting that Michael Lynn did severe damage to his career might want to retract those statements now that the former ISS researcher and current Cisco nemesis has landed at Juniper Networks. Although it's unclear what Lynn's role is or how long he's been with Cisco's biggest rival, I'm sure that conspiracy theorists will have a field day with this one. Lynn, you'll remember if you weren't on Mars this summer, has become infamo

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Hacking Back: Cyber Counterterrorism

11/4/2005
The recent arrest and 17-count indictment against 20-year-old accused hacker and botmaster Jeanson James Ancheta for both using and selling the tools to attack a number of networks, including some within the Defense Department, should be taken as a shot across the bow by anyone who reads this. Ancheta is accused of being part of a new breed of criminal hacker: not just in it for the fame--sure, he's getting his 15 minutes, although it could be more like 50 years--but rather after money. Accordin

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Spyware Proliferates As Feds Crack Down

10/11/2005
As the business of spyware proliferates and grows in complexity, companies are looking for ways to quickly rid their PCs of a problem that has evolved from a pesky plaque that slows system performance to an outright security threat for corporate data.

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Another Casualty For Homeland Security

4/8/2005
Nowhere has the government's struggle to keep the country safe while at the same time preserving individual liberties been more pronounced than at the Transportation Security Administration. On 9/11 air travel proved to be the weakest link in national security, and a lot of money and effort has since been spent to correct this. Now TSA, which launched in 2002 with ambitious and uncompromising goals of using technology and manpower to keep the airways from again being used as instruments of terro

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3-D Expected To Have More Success With Security Than With Sharks

3/9/2005
3-D isn't much more than a gimmick when it comes to movies. I didn't find Jaws 3 (in 3-D!) any scarier than the first two films simply because my eyes could perceive a subtle depth between the killer shark and its victims. But in the world of biometric security, 3-D is poised to become a significant breakthrough in the quest to keep the bad guys off of airplanes and away from the nation's critical infrastructure. The question is, when?

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Ransomware Grabs Headlines but BEC May Be a Bigger Threat
Marc Wilczek, Digital Strategist & CIO Advisor,  10/12/2017
20 Questions to Ask Yourself before Giving a Security Conference Talk
Joshua Goldfarb, Co-founder & Chief Product Officer, IDDRA,  10/16/2017
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CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.