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 Troy Leach and Christopher Strand
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Profile of Troy Leach and Christopher Strand

Chief Technology Officer, PCI Security Standards Council & Senior Director of Compliance, Bit9
News & Commentary Posts: 1

Troy Leach is the Chief Technology Officer for the PCI Security Standards Council (SSC). In his role, Mr Leach partners with Council representatives, Participating Organizations and industry leaders to develop comprehensive standards and strategies to secure payment card data and the supporting infrastructure. He is a Congressional subject matter expert on payment security and the current chairman of the Council's Standards Committee. Prior to joining the PCI Council, Mr Leach has held various positions in IT management, software development, systems administration, network engineering, security assessment, forensic analytics and incident response for data compromise.

For the past three years Christopher Strand has served as the Director of Compliance Programs at Bit9. With over 20 years of information technology experience, Strand is the subject matter expert on Bit9's IT Governance, Audit, and Compliance programs. He oversees the development of enterprise network and application security solutions that help organizations deploy positive security to maintain and improve their compliance posture. Previously, Strand held security/compliance positions at Trustwave, Tripwire, EMC/RSA and Compuware. Strand is a PCI Professional (PCIP) and has completed QSA training. He has been trained on and is proficient with other regulatory disciplines including HIPAA, NERC and GLBA. Chris often speaks on security and compliance issues.

Articles by Troy Leach and Christopher Strand
Higher Education: 15 Books to Help Cybersecurity Pros Be Better
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/12/2018
Worst Password Blunders of 2018 Hit Organizations East and West
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  12/12/2018
2019 Attacker Playbook
Ericka Chickowski, Contributing Writer, Dark Reading,  12/14/2018
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From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-6978
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
vRealize Operations (7.x before 7.0.0.11287810, 6.7.x before 6.7.0.11286837 and 6.6.x before 6.6.1.11286876) contains a local privilege escalation vulnerability due to improper permissions of support scripts. Admin user of the vROps application with shell access may exploit this issue to elevate the...
CVE-2018-20213
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
wbook_addworksheet in workbook.c in libexcel.a in libexcel 0.01 allows attackers to cause a denial of service (SEGV) via a long name. NOTE: this is not a Microsoft product.
CVE-2017-15031
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
In all versions of ARM Trusted Firmware up to and including v1.4, not initializing or saving/restoring the PMCR_EL0 register can leak secure world timing information.
CVE-2018-19522
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
DriverAgent 2.2015.7.14, which includes DrvAgent64.sys 1.0.0.1, allows a user to send an IOCTL (0x800020F4) with a buffer containing user defined content. The driver's subroutine will execute a wrmsr instruction with the user's buffer for partial input.
CVE-2018-1833
PUBLISHED: 2018-12-18
IBM Event Streams 2018.3.0 could allow a remote attacker to submit an API request with a fake Host request header. An attacker, who has already gained authorised access via the CLI, could exploit this vulnerability to spoof the request header. IBM X-Force ID: 150507.