Attacks/Breaches

11/17/2014
07:30 PM
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The Year Of The Retailer Data Breach

This year's wave of attacks was more dramatic in its widespread scope and seemingly constant battering of more than a dozen big box chains.
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Cybercriminals found their sweet spot this past year with the retail industry, where some of the biggest big-box brand names and franchises were infiltrated by malware that helped the bad guys steal millions of credit and debit-card account numbers of shoppers. 

(Image: Sean MacEntee)

(Image: Sean MacEntee)

Data breaches are nothing new for the retail industry -- think TJX in 2005, Dave & Buster's in 2007, to name a few -- but this year's wave of attacks was different and more dramatic in its widespread scope and seemingly constant battering of big box retailers, with more than a dozen of them disclosing data breaches, including Target, Home Depot, Michael's, Dairy Queen, and most recently, Kmart. 

Target became the poster child for how not to conduct an incident response operation, with more than 40 million payment cards pilfered from its computers after ignoring security alarms from the attack and then experiencing a public disclosure disaster that ultimately resulted in the departure of its CIO and CEO.

[The next Dark Reading Radio episode on Nov. 19 at 1:00 p.m. ET (10:00 a.m. PT) features retail security experts from Mandiant and the retail industry. Read Retail Hacking: What To Expect This Holiday Season.]

So just in time for the 2014 holiday shopping season, here's a look at 13 major retailers who revealed this past year that they had suffered data breaches. Don't be suprised if a few more come forward before we ring in 2015. 

 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

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GaryG880
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GaryG880,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/22/2014 | 8:22:49 PM
Re: So has the retail industry learned from all these high profile breaches?
One easy answer   NO!
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
11/18/2014 | 5:03:17 PM
Re: So has the retail industry learned from all these high profile breaches?
@TomT640, that's one of the issues I will be asking our retail security experts tomorrow on Dark Reading Radio. There was a study today from BitSight that found 1/3 of retail breaches originated from their 3rd party vendors. 
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/18/2014 | 4:28:44 PM
Re: So has the retail industry learned from all these high profile breaches?
That's a good point, @TomT640, (not to mention that I really liked the metaphor "pulling their socks up.")

I hope you'll bring your point of view to our Dark Reading Radio show tomorrow (Wed. 11/19 at 1 pm. EST). We have a great topic Retail Hacking: What To Expect This Holiday Season, with Kelly Jackson Higgins and her guests, Nick Pelletier, senior consultant, Mandiant, and Arthur Tisi, CIO, Natural Markets Food Group. They'll be  talking about what retailers can do to keep both their customers and their transactions safe.

Here's the link to the show: http://www.darkreading.com/radio.asp?webinar_id=162

 
TomT640
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TomT640,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2014 | 12:33:48 PM
So has the retail industry learned from all these high profile breaches?
It would seem that those that were breached are 'pulling up their socks' as they say in England but that is no easy task given that a lot of these profiled breaches were down to vulnerabilities in their supply chain.  It is one thing to put your own house in order, it is more challenging to figure out what 3rd parties can and should do, in order to make you more secure.
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