Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

12/18/2017
03:40 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

Kaspersky Lab Files Lawsuit Over DHS Ban of its Products

Security firm petitions US District Court to rescind decision to prohibit its products on US federal government systems.

Kaspersky Lab is fighting back against the Trump administration's recent ban of its security products in agency networks with a lawsuit filed today in US District Court for the District of Columbia (DC).

The Moscow-based security company is seeking the appeal of US Department of Homeland Security's September 13 Binding Operational Directive 17-01 that banned federal agencies from using Kaspersky Lab security products on their systems. The DHS policy prohibiting the use of Kaspersky Lab software came in the wake of concerns about potential ties between officials at Kaspersky Lab and Russian intelligence agenices, and required federal agencies running Kaspersky software to remove it.

Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky, said in an open letter today that DHS's directive violated his company's rights and constitutional due process, and harmed its revenue and reputation, so legal action was merited. He also called out "rumors" and media reports.

"The company did not undertake this action lightly, but maintains that DHS failed to provide Kaspersky Lab with adequate due process and relied primarily on subjective, non-technical public sources like uncorroborated and often anonymously sourced media reports and rumors in issuing and finalizing the Directive," he wrote. "DHS has harmed Kaspersky Lab’s reputation and its commercial operations without any evidence of wrongdoing by the company. Therefore, it is in Kaspersky Lab’s interest to defend itself in this matter."

Kaspersky Lab argued its case under the Administrative Procedure Act.

Eugene Kaspersky noted that his company contacted DHS in mid-July to discuss any concerns with the company or its products, but the agency did not follow up on the company's offer to discuss its concerns.

"DHS confirmed receipt of Kaspersky Lab’s letter in mid-August, appreciating the company’s offer to provide said information and expressing interest in future communications with the company regarding this matter. Kaspersky Lab believed in good faith that DHS would take the company up on its offer to engage on these issues and hear from the company before taking any adverse action," the CEO said in the open letter. "However, there was no subsequent communication from DHS to Kaspersky Lab until the notification regarding the issuance of Binding Operational Directive 17-01 on September 13, 2017."

DHS in its decision to blacklist Kaspersky Lab software cited its concerns of Russian law requiring companies to cooperate with its intelligence agencies.

"The Department is concerned about the ties between certain Kaspersky officials and Russian intelligence and other government agencies, and requirements under Russian law that allow Russian intelligence agencies to request or compel assistance from Kaspersky and to intercept communications transiting Russian networks," the Department of Homeland Security stated in its ban decision. "The risk that the Russian government, whether acting on its own or in collaboration with Kaspersky, could capitalize on access provided by Kaspersky products to compromise federal information and information systems directly implicates US national security." 

According to the firm, it is calling for its due process and "repair the harm caused to its commercial operations, its U.S.-based employees, and its U.S.-based business partners."  

"Because Kaspersky Lab has not been provided a fair opportunity in regards to the allegations and no technical evidence has been produced to validate DHS's actions, it is in the company's interests to defend itself in this matter. Regardless of the DHS decision, we will continue to do what really matters: make the world safer from cybercrime," Eugene Kaspersky said in a statement.

Related Content:

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio
 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Jim.d
50%
50%
Jim.d,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/19/2017 | 11:20:22 AM
Kaspersky Lawsuit
Won't the presence of the similar ban in the just signed National Defense Authorization Act make overturning this even more difficult?  Seems to me that the courts are reluctant to overturn things that passed both houses of congress and then are signed by the president.  
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 9/25/2020
9 Tips to Prepare for the Future of Cloud & Network Security
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  9/28/2020
Attacker Dwell Time: Ransomware's Most Important Metric
Ricardo Villadiego, Founder and CEO of Lumu,  9/30/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How IT Security Organizations are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
The COVID-19 pandemic turned the world -- and enterprise computing -- on end. Here's a look at how cybersecurity teams are retrenching their defense strategies, rebuilding their teams, and selecting new technologies to stop the oncoming rise of online attacks.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-25288
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
An issue was discovered in MantisBT before 2.24.3. When editing an Issue in a Project where a Custom Field with a crafted Regular Expression property is used, improper escaping of the corresponding form input's pattern attribute allows HTML injection and, if CSP settings permit, execution of arbitra...
CVE-2020-25781
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
An issue was discovered in file_download.php in MantisBT before 2.24.3. Users without access to view private issue notes are able to download the (supposedly private) attachments linked to these notes by accessing the corresponding file download URL directly.
CVE-2020-25830
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
An issue was discovered in MantisBT before 2.24.3. Improper escaping of a custom field's name allows an attacker to inject HTML and, if CSP settings permit, achieve execution of arbitrary JavaScript when attempting to update said custom field via bug_actiongroup_page.php.
CVE-2020-26159
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
In Oniguruma 6.9.5_rev1, an attacker able to supply a regular expression for compilation may be able to overflow a buffer by one byte in concat_opt_exact_str in src/regcomp.c .
CVE-2020-6654
PUBLISHED: 2020-09-30
A DLL Hijacking vulnerability in Eaton's 9000x Programming and Configuration Software v 2.0.38 and prior allows an attacker to execute arbitrary code by replacing the required DLLs with malicious DLLs when the software try to load vci11un6.DLL and cinpl.DLL.