JP Morgan Hacker Pleads Guilty

Andrei Tyurin, a Russian national, pleaded guilty to hacking charges related to a massive cyberattack campaign targeting US financial institutions and other companies.



Russian national Andrei Tyurin, who was extradited to the US last year by Georgian officials for allegedly hacking JP Morgan Chase in 2014 as well as several other cyberattacks on US financial and other organizations, now faces sentencing after a guilty plea in US District Court.

Tyurin, 35, was involved in a wide-ranging hacking campaign that targeted US financial organizations, brokerage firms, financial news publishers, and other companies, from 2012 to mid-2015, stealing information from more than 100 million customers. The JP Morgan attack was a record-breaking breach of more than 80 million customers of the US bank.

His co-conspirators include Gery Shalon, Joshua Samuel Aaron, and Ziv Orenstein, according to a US Department of Justice release. He pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit computer hacking, one count of wire fraud, one count of conspiracy to violate gambling laws, and one count of conspiracy to commit wire and bank fraud, among other charges. The various charges carry anywhere from five to 30 years in prison, and he will be sentenced February 13, 2020.

Read more here.

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