Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

3/3/2015
03:00 PM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
100%
0%

FREAK Out: Yet Another New SSL/TLS Bug Found

Old-school, export-grade crypto standard used until the 1990s can be triggered to downgrade security of client, servers, researchers find.

Turns out the old US government restriction of exporting strong encryption that led to the shipping of weaker 512-bit crypto products overseas didn't actually disappear with the outdated policy in the late 1990s. A group of researchers from Microsoft Research, INRIA and IMDEA, has found that some SSL/TLS client and server implementations--such as OpenSSL versions 1.01k and earlier and Apple Safari--can be forced to employ the weaker cipher suite.

The weaker SSL/TLS encryption key can be easily cracked, researchers say, and used to wage man-in-the-middle attacks on the secured connections in order to sniff passwords or other sensitive information.

Some one-fourth of SSL-encrypted websites are potentially vulnerable to attacks using the so-called FREAK (Factoring RSA Export Keys) vulnerability. Affected website owners in the government and private sector are currently scrambling to correct the oversight. FBI.gov and Whitehouse.gov reportedly are among the websites that have since been remedied of the problem, and Apple is in the process of coming up with a patch for its software. OpenSSL-based browsers on Android devices also are affected by the bug.

OpenSSL actually patched the issue in January, but details of the vulnerability are just now coming to light publicly.

"It's a very interesting problem that shows how we mustn't be complacent about these older technologies, even though we think they are not going to be used," says SSL expert Ivan Ristic, who is director of engineering at Qualys. "The attack seems fairly easy, conceptually."

The researchers say it would take about 7½ hours using $104 in Amazon EC2 computing power to crack the key, he notes.

But, as Ristic points out, that's just the first step to an attack: "Then they need to find a vulnerable client," he says. "In practice, I don't think this is a terribly big issue, but only because you have to have many 'ducks in a row.'"

An attack also would require exploiting a server that includes the older cipher suite option, as well as reusing a key for a long period of time, and of course, a man-in-the middle attack via a local area network or a WiFi network, he says. "It's not so easy otherwise," from afar, he says.

The FREAK problem dates back to a time when the US government had instituted a policy of only exporting weak crypto overseas to ensure the NSA could decrypt foreign communications; sale of strong encryption technology overseas was banned.

"Support for these weak algorithms has remained in many implementations such as OpenSSL, even though they are typically disabled by default; however, we discovered that several implementations incorrectly allow the message sequence of export cipher suites to be used even if a non-export ciphersuite was negotiated," the researchers wrote. "Thus, if a server is willing to negotiate an export ciphersuite, a man-in-the-middle may trick a browser (which normally doesn't allow it) to use a weak export key. By design, export RSA moduli must be less than 512 bits long; hence, they can be factored in less than 12 hours for $50 on Amazon EC2."

The researchers say NSA's site also allows the use of the older crypto, as does the OAuth SDK server used by Facebook, IBM, and Symantec.

Cryptographer Matthew Green, a research professor at Johns Hopkins University, blogged today that there's more to this finding than the potential attack. "You might think this is all a bit absurd and doesn’t affect you very much. In a strictly technical sense you’re probably right. The client bugs have will soon be patched (update your devices! unless you have Android in which case you're screwed). With good luck, servers supporting export-grade RSA cipher suites will soon be rare curiosity," Green says.

The big takeaway here, he says, is how an old policy to weaken crypto for the intel community is haunting security today.  

"The export-grade RSA ciphers are the remains of a 1980s-vintage effort to weaken cryptography so that intelligence agencies would be able to monitor. This was done badly. So badly, that while the policies were ultimately scrapped, they’re still hurting us today," Green says.

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
TomS92801
100%
0%
TomS92801,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/4/2015 | 8:23:52 AM
SSL FREAK Checker
Here's a useful SSL FREAK Checker: https://tools.keycdn.com/freak

It lets you know if your site is vulnerable. 
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
3/4/2015 | 11:31:56 AM
Re: SSL FREAK Checker
SSL Labs also has a free scan service: https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/
Where Businesses Waste Endpoint Security Budgets
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/15/2019
US Mayors Commit to Just Saying No to Ransomware
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/16/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Building and Managing an IT Security Operations Program
As cyber threats grow, many organizations are building security operations centers (SOCs) to improve their defenses. In this Tech Digest you will learn tips on how to get the most out of a SOC in your organization - and what to do if you can't afford to build one.
Flash Poll
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
The State of IT Operations and Cybersecurity Operations
Your enterprise's cyber risk may depend upon the relationship between the IT team and the security team. Heres some insight on what's working and what isn't in the data center.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-14230
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-21
An issue was discovered in the Viral Quiz Maker - OnionBuzz plugin before 1.2.7 for WordPress. One could exploit the id parameter in the set_count ajax nopriv handler due to there being no sanitization prior to use in a SQL query in saveQuestionVote. This allows an unauthenticated/unprivileged user ...
CVE-2019-14231
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-21
An issue was discovered in the Viral Quiz Maker - OnionBuzz plugin before 1.2.2 for WordPress. One could exploit the points parameter in the ob_get_results ajax nopriv handler due to there being no sanitization prior to use in a SQL query in getResultByPointsTrivia. This allows an unauthenticated/un...
CVE-2019-14207
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-21
An issue was discovered in Foxit PhantomPDF before 8.3.11. The application could crash when calling the clone function due to an endless loop resulting from confusing relationships between a child and parent object (caused by an append error).
CVE-2019-14208
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-21
An issue was discovered in Foxit PhantomPDF before 8.3.10. The application could be exposed to a NULL pointer dereference and crash when getting a PDF object from a document, or parsing a certain portfolio that contains a null dictionary.
CVE-2019-14209
PUBLISHED: 2019-07-21
An issue was discovered in Foxit PhantomPDF before 8.3.10. The application could be exposed to Heap Corruption due to data desynchrony when adding AcroForm.