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Attacks/Breaches

10/1/2019
02:15 PM
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'Father of Identity Theft' Convicted on 13 Federal Counts

James Jackson, a 58-year-old Memphis resident, used the identities of deceased individuals to steal money from banks and the estates of the dead.

James Jackson, the self-proclaimed "Father of Identity Theft," has been convicted of 13 counts of mail fraud, aggravated identity theft, access device fraud, and theft of mail. He now faces up to 30 years in prison at his December 13 sentencing.

According to information presented in court, in 2014 and 2015 Jackson obtained the identifying information from a number of individuals, most of whom had died, and used the information to take over financial accounts. In most cases, he used the information to order new credit cards in the name of the deceased. In at least one case, he authorized the sale of more than $340,000 from an individual's investment accounts.

Jackson was caught when postal inspectors and the FBI recognized a request for new credit cards coming from a recently deceased individual. They observed the mailbox where the credit cards were shipped, saw Jackson take possession of the cards, and arrested him at his home.

In Jackson's home, they found computers, documents, and books on finding individuals. A search of his mother's house found a box of business cards identifying Jackson as the "Father of Identity Theft."

For more, read here.

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