Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

10/11/2012
04:00 PM
Dark Reading
Dark Reading
Products and Releases
50%
50%

EU: 51 Severe Outages Reported Over 2011

In annual report, ENISA summarizes and analyzes incidents

This year, for the first time in the EU, all Member States have reported on past cyber security incidents to the EU's 'cyber security' agency ENISA and the European Commission. Eleven EU countries reported 51 severe outages of electronic communication networks or services. Today, ENISA publishes the first ever annual report on this, containing an analysis of incidents in 2011.

Under Article 13a of the EU's telecom reform directive (Directive 2009/140/EC), EU Member States are required to make summary reports on major outages once a year to ENISA and the European Commission. The first summary incident reports for 2011 were sent to ENISA in May 2012. In total, 11 countries reported outages. This number reflects the fact that many countries implemented national reporting schemes only towards the end of 2011. ENISA Experts Marnix Dekker and Christoffer Karsberg remark:

"This year, the Member States have more mature national incident reporting schemes. So next year we expect to publish an annual report with about 10 times more incidents."

In the annual report, ENISA summarizes and analyses the 51 reported incidents:

Most of the reported incidents affected mobile telephony or mobile internet (60%).

Incidents affecting mobile telephony or mobile internet affected most users (around 300.000 users), which is consistent with the high number of mobile users.

Incidents show that communication services (both fixed and mobile) strongly depend on the power supply.

Natural phenomena like storms, floods and heavy snow have a big impact on the power supply of providers. Natural phenomena cause long lasting incidents, around 45 hours on average.

The annual report also provides a summary of Article 13a and how it was implemented by ENISA and the EU Member States. The incidents will be discussed in more detail in the Article 13a working group which consists of all electronic communication regulators from EU countries, and technical experts from ENISA. In 2013, ENISA and the EC will collect the incident reports concerning outages that occurred in 2012. The next annual report will be published in the spring of 2013.

The Executive Director of ENISA, Professor Udo Helmbrecht comments: "We are now, for the first time, equipped with an overview of major cyber incidents in Europe. This is a decisive moment for the EU's efforts to improve understanding of the impact of cyber security incidents. But this still deals with only a small subset of cyber security incidents. This type of reporting should be extended to cover a wider range of incidents and more sectors."

For the full report with all data and analysis: Annual Incidents Report 2011

For interviews: Graeme Cooper, Head of Public Affairs, ENISA, Mobile: +30 6951 782 268 or Dr Marnix Dekker, [email protected]

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
News
A Startup With NSA Roots Wants Silently Disarming Cyberattacks on the Wire to Become the Norm
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  5/11/2021
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
Cybersecurity: What Is Truly Essential?
Joshua Goldfarb, Director of Product Management at F5,  5/12/2021
Commentary
3 Cybersecurity Myths to Bust
Etay Maor, Sr. Director Security Strategy at Cato Networks,  5/11/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
2021 Top Enterprise IT Trends
We've identified the key trends that are poised to impact the IT landscape in 2021. Find out why they're important and how they will affect you today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
How Enterprises are Developing Secure Applications
Recent breaches of third-party apps are driving many organizations to think harder about the security of their off-the-shelf software as they continue to move left in secure software development practices.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-3200
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-18
Buffer overflow vulnerability in libsolv 2020-12-13 via the Solver * testcase_read(Pool *pool, FILE *fp, const char *testcase, Queue *job, char **resultp, int *resultflagsp function at src/testcase.c: line 2334, which could cause a denial of service
CVE-2021-32305
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-18
WebSVN before 2.6.1 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary commands via shell metacharacters in the search parameter.
CVE-2020-20951
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-18
In Pluck-4.7.10-dev2 admin background, a remote command execution vulnerability exists when uploading files.
CVE-2020-23861
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-18
A heap-based buffer overflow vulnerability exists in LibreDWG 0.10.1 via the read_system_page function at libredwg-0.10.1/src/decode_r2007.c:666:5, which causes a denial of service by submitting a dwg file.
CVE-2020-24740
PUBLISHED: 2021-05-18
An issue was discovered in Pluck 4.7.10-dev2. There is a CSRF vulnerability that can editpage via a /admin.php?action=editpage