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Attacks/Breaches

5/23/2017
04:28 PM
Dawn Kawamoto
Dawn Kawamoto
Slideshows

9 Ways Organizations Sabotage Their Own Security: Lessons from the Verizon DBIR

Mistakes and missteps plague enterprise security. The Verizon 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) offers nuggets on what organizations must stop doing - now.
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Slow response to a security incident.

A high percentage of point-of-sale (POS) incidents are turned into outright breaches because cybercriminals have particularly good tools to get the job done, says Verizon's Widup.

Not only do cybercriminals have good hacking tools, but companies are also slow to discover the infiltration, allowing attackers the time to root around and steal the desired information, escalating an incident into a breach. According to the DBIR, it takes cyberattackers just seconds to compromise POS terminals and controllers, but days to retrieve, copy, and transfer the desired data. In the meantime, it's taking organizations months to discovery and contain the breach, the report notes.

The accommodations industry, for example, suffered the most examples of allowing an incident to escalate into a breach, according to the DBIR. Of the 182 POS incidents, 180 turned into actual POS breaches. But on the flip side, the public sector's 7,417 privilege misuse incidents resulted in only 58 breaches, according to the DBIR.

Image Source: Verizon 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report

Slow response to a security incident.

A high percentage of point-of-sale (POS) incidents are turned into outright breaches because cybercriminals have particularly good tools to get the job done, says Verizon's Widup.

Not only do cybercriminals have good hacking tools, but companies are also slow to discover the infiltration, allowing attackers the time to root around and steal the desired information, escalating an incident into a breach. According to the DBIR, it takes cyberattackers just seconds to compromise POS terminals and controllers, but days to retrieve, copy, and transfer the desired data. In the meantime, it's taking organizations months to discovery and contain the breach, the report notes.

The accommodations industry, for example, suffered the most examples of allowing an incident to escalate into a breach, according to the DBIR. Of the 182 POS incidents, 180 turned into actual POS breaches. But on the flip side, the public sector's 7,417 privilege misuse incidents resulted in only 58 breaches, according to the DBIR.

Image Source: Verizon 2017 Data Breach Investigations Report

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