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Attacks/Breaches

6/12/2020
01:40 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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7 Must-Haves for a Rockin' Red Team

Follow these tips for running red-team exercises that will deliver added insight into your operations.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock: Parilov

Image Source: Adobe Stock: Parilov

With the threat landscape as dangerous as it is today, all organizations need deeper insights into their networks. That's where red-team exercises can help.

Despite the expense, the vast majority of companies will engage with third parties to conduct them. But building an in-house team is also an option. Either way, everyone should understand some red-team basics.

"Start by trusting your gut and don't overthink complex problems," says Daniel Wood, associate vice president of consulting at Bishop Fox, who recently posted a blog based on his experience managing red teams. "If you start to think something might be amiss or just plain wrong for the environment you're in, chances are it is. And if you are too reactive to what's around, you will be one step behind. A primary goal of a red team is to dictate and develop the situation, not to let others do it for you."

What should happen after that gut check? This list of seven tips will help you get the most from a red-team exercise.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience and has covered networking, security, and IT as a writer and editor since 1992. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio
 

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peternjohnson
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peternjohnson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/9/2020 | 1:31:04 PM
slide show? Still?
Nope.

What is this clickbait central? How annoying, post an article if you really want people to be responsive.

 
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