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Attacks/Breaches

9/13/2019
01:30 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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6 Questions to Ask Once You’ve Learned of a Breach

With GDPR enacted and the California Consumer Privacy Act on the near horizon, companies have to sharpen up their responses. Start by asking these six questions.
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1. Did a breach actually take place? 
Josh Zelonis, a principal analyst serving security and risk professionals at Forrester, says before anything goes into motion, the security team must evaluate the claim of a breach that has come in from an external source and validate that it took place. Zelonis adds that the process should be no different than when the company finds out about a potential breach by monitoring the network internally. 'The same principles apply whether the company learns of a breach from a third party or through internal network monitoring,' he says.

Image Source: Adobe Stock: Africa Studio

1. Did a breach actually take place?

Josh Zelonis, a principal analyst serving security and risk professionals at Forrester, says before anything goes into motion, the security team must evaluate the claim of a breach that has come in from an external source and validate that it took place. Zelonis adds that the process should be no different than when the company finds out about a potential breach by monitoring the network internally. “The same principles apply whether the company learns of a breach from a third party or through internal network monitoring,” he says.

Image Source: Adobe Stock: Africa Studio

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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/16/2019 | 3:22:27 PM
Nouns
Words are important and ages ago Cliff Stoll wrote an engaging book THE CUCKOO'S NEST which should be required reading for any cyber pro.  In this book, at one point, he was asked by the FBI to define the threat and theft.  Their language was proper and mild and I think this is so here...

Threat Actor?  No - how about Bald Faced Criminal

Ongoing?  No, how about barn door still unlocked?

Data theft?  No, how above did they empty Fort Knox.

Ongoing?  No, are the black trucks still at the docking back.

Restoration protocol?  No, are we still screwed in putting shit back-together?

Don't have a plan?  are we then up Schitt's creek with no paddle or boat? 

I noticed that responsibility for defense was not mentioned?
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