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Attacks/Breaches

9/13/2019
01:30 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
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6 Questions to Ask Once Youve Learned of a Breach

With GDPR enacted and the California Consumer Privacy Act on the near horizon, companies have to sharpen up their responses. Start by asking these six questions.
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Image Source: Adobe Stock: Yury Zap

Image Source: Adobe Stock: Yury Zap

 

Companies don't have the luxury of waiting days and even weeks before they report a data breach to the public. Many global firms do business overseas and are subject to GDPR, and California's data privacy law goes into effect Jan. 1, 2020. There are other such measures on the way in India and Brazil.

All these new measures require that companies report a breach within 72 hours.

That means it's more important than ever for companies to know how to respond once they learn that they've been breached. The M-Trends 2019 report released by FireEye Mandiant found that 59% of breaches are self-detected, while 41% are reported to breached companies by external sources.

Charles Carmakal, strategic services CTO for FireEye Mandiant advises companies to start by validating that a breach took place and if you haven’t already, develop a comprehensive incident response plan.

"It's really important to know what the attack was and why the bad threat actors broke in," Carmakal says. "Do your due diligence and have this information because it will really help you from a legal perspective if the case gets turned over the law enforcement and there's an indictment."

While some companies have clear processes and procedures in place, many companies (especially SMBs) are not at all prepared to handle a breach. Start by asking the following six questions.

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/16/2019 | 3:22:27 PM
Nouns
Words are important and ages ago Cliff Stoll wrote an engaging book THE CUCKOO'S NEST which should be required reading for any cyber pro.  In this book, at one point, he was asked by the FBI to define the threat and theft.  Their language was proper and mild and I think this is so here...

Threat Actor?  No - how about Bald Faced Criminal

Ongoing?  No, how about barn door still unlocked?

Data theft?  No, how above did they empty Fort Knox.

Ongoing?  No, are the black trucks still at the docking back.

Restoration protocol?  No, are we still screwed in putting shit back-together?

Don't have a plan?  are we then up Schitt's creek with no paddle or boat? 

I noticed that responsibility for defense was not mentioned?
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