Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

4/9/2018
01:00 PM
Steve Zurier
Steve Zurier
Slideshows
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

6 Myths About IoT Security

Here are common misconceptions about securing these devices - and tips for locking them down.
Previous
1 of 7
Next

Image Source: tulpahn via Shutterstock

Image Source: tulpahn via Shutterstock

There's every reason to be concerned about the potential of an IoT system, sensor, or device being hacked in the enterprise or a user's home office.

These devices regularly are exposed for their vulnerabilities, and most are not built with security in mind. An attack via an IoT device can blindside an organization: Take the hotel in Las Vegas last year that lost data when a hacker made his way on to the network through a high-tech fish tank.

Over time, just about every household appliance and piece of office equipment will have an IP address, which means it will be potentially open to hackers.

Forrester's Merritt Maxim says 92% of global technology decision-makers with more than 1,000 employees say they have security policies in place for their firm's use of IoT devices and solutions. However, only 47% consider their security tools sufficient. A full 34% consider their security tools insufficient and another 10% say they do not have security tools to enforce their IoT security policies.

"I think the biggest misconception people have is that these type of hacks could not happen in real life," Maxim says. "People don’t think that their refrigerator, car, or office will be hacked, but the threat is real and the likelihood is that these threats will only increase."

Imposing though the threat has become, Suneil Sastri, director of product and content marketing at SOTI, adds that there are steps IT staffs can take to mitigate the threat.

"People need to understand that there are solutions," Sastri says. "IT people and consumers can change passwords, encrypt devices, and remotely patch devices. What we're concerned about is that people won't move forward with IoT because they are worried about security."

Jeff Wilbur, director of the Online Trust Alliance, says the good news is that some IoT vendors are fixing exposed vulnerabilities in their products, such as Fitbit, LG's Smart ThinQ dishwashers, and Samsung SmartThings. 

Here are some common myths about securing IoT devices and systems.

 

 

Steve Zurier has more than 30 years of journalism and publishing experience, most of the last 24 of which were spent covering networking and security technology. Steve is based in Columbia, Md. View Full Bio

Previous
1 of 7
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Malicious USB Drive Hides Behind Gift Card Lure
Dark Reading Staff 3/27/2020
How Attackers Could Use Azure Apps to Sneak into Microsoft 365
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  3/24/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: This comment is waiting for review by our moderators.
Current Issue
6 Emerging Cyber Threats That Enterprises Face in 2020
This Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at six emerging cyber threats that enterprises could face in 2020. Download your copy today!
Flash Poll
State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
Data breaches and regulations have forced organizations to pay closer attention to the security incident response function. However, security leaders may be overestimating their ability to detect and respond to security incidents. Read this report to find out more.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-10940
PUBLISHED: 2020-03-27
Local Privilege Escalation can occur in PHOENIX CONTACT PORTICO SERVER through 3.0.7 when installed to run as a service.
CVE-2020-10939
PUBLISHED: 2020-03-27
Insecure, default path permissions in PHOENIX CONTACT PC WORX SRT through 1.14 allow for local privilege escalation.
CVE-2020-6095
PUBLISHED: 2020-03-27
An exploitable denial of service vulnerability exists in the GstRTSPAuth functionality of GStreamer/gst-rtsp-server 1.14.5. A specially crafted RTSP setup request can cause a null pointer deference resulting in denial-of-service. An attacker can send a malicious packet to trigger this vulnerability.
CVE-2020-10817
PUBLISHED: 2020-03-27
The custom-searchable-data-entry-system (aka Custom Searchable Data Entry System) plugin through 1.7.1 for WordPress allows SQL Injection. NOTE: this product is discontinued.
CVE-2020-10952
PUBLISHED: 2020-03-27
GitLab EE/CE 8.11 through 12.9.1 allows blocked users to pull/push docker images.