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4/28/2016
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10 Newsmakers Who Shaped Security In the Past Decade

In celebration of Dark Reading's 10th anniversary, we profile ten people whose actions influenced and shaped the trajectory of the industry - for better or for worse -- in the past ten years.
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A lot can happen in just one day in the security industry—heck, sometimes in just one hour--so consider how much has transpired over the past ten years. The headlines the year Dark Reading first went live in 2006 were everything from the Month of Browser Bugs to the arrest of a rogue insider at DuPont who downloaded his company’s intellectual property and tried to cover his tracks by burning the stolen documents in his fireplace. Behind the news were people whose actions, good and bad, still resonate (or haunt us) today. They have influenced the evolution of the industry, including technology, security practices, and the business of security.

There obviously were way more than 10 influential newsmakers since 2006, but since it’s our tenth anniversary, we had to keep our list to just 10. Even so, we also provide a shoutout to some other notable players here as well.

Kick back and join us for a retrospective on people who made some of the biggest news in the past ten years. And please do share your top newsmakers in our Comments section below. 

 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is the Executive Editor of Dark Reading. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio
 

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