Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

12/17/2007
05:35 AM
50%
50%

Redefining the Perimeter

Mobile devices offer great flexibility for users, but be sure you apply the right security rules

3:35 PM -- Every other month, I read an article or blog that talks about the network perimeter being dead. But it isn’t that the perimeter is dead; it’s just changed.

It used to be that enterprise networks had a well-defined perimeter, where a firewall separated internal hosts from the scary, hacker-laden Internet. Holes would be poked into the firewall to allow external hosts to access a few well-protected mail and Web servers, maybe DNS, but that was it.

Then came the mobile workforce, which required bigger holes in the firewall -- usually in the form of a VPN -- to allow the road warriors to get their work done while they were traveling around the world. Malicious hackers took advantage of those mobile devices and used them as jumping points into the corporate network.

Today, this is the kind of thing that keeps security pros awake at night. These remote endpoints have a level of access similar to the level they'd have on company property. Essentially, they become extensions of the perimeter.

Location-aware host-based firewalls have stepped into help make managing the firewalls on endpoints easier. The concept is simple: If the laptop is in the office, the firewall will be disabled or very relaxed; if it is anywhere else, it will tighten up like Fort Knox. Most of the major endpoint security vendors have adapted this technology in the last year and a half.

Location-aware firewalls work by analyzing network characteristics assigned through DHCP-like IP address, subnet, gateway, and DNS servers. If the network properties match pre-defined parameters, then a specific firewall is applied.

If you’re looking at this technology or already have it in place, I encourage you to not overlook the importance of the firewall rules for when the host is within the internal network. Don’t assume that since it is within your corporate perimeter that it is safe.

Imagine if a stolen laptop used disk encryption so the hard drive couldn’t be removed and analyzed -- yet booted up within Windows waiting for a user and password. A determined attacker could learn enough about your internal network that they could simulate it in order to trick the machine into opening itself up to attack.

Security technologies are great... until they can be used against you. Be diligent in all aspects of host-based protection, because each one is a backdoor into your network.

– John H. Sawyer is a security geek on the IT Security Team at the University of Florida. He enjoys taking long war walks on the beach and riding pwnies. When he's not fighting flaming, malware-infested machines or performing autopsies on blitzed boxes, he can usually be found hanging with his family, bouncing a baby on one knee and balancing a laptop on the other. Special to Dark Reading

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/3/2020
Pen Testers Who Got Arrested Doing Their Jobs Tell All
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/5/2020
'BootHole' Vulnerability Exposes Secure Boot Devices to Attack
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/29/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-17364
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-05
USVN (aka User-friendly SVN) before 1.0.9 allows XSS via SVN logs.
CVE-2020-4481
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-05
IBM UrbanCode Deploy (UCD) 6.2.7.3, 6.2.7.4, 7.0.3.0, and 7.0.4.0 is vulnerable to an XML External Entity Injection (XXE) attack when processing XML data. A remote attacker could exploit this vulnerability to expose sensitive information or consume memory resources. IBM X-Force ID: 181848.
CVE-2020-5608
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-05
CAMS for HIS CENTUM CS 3000 (includes CENTUM CS 3000 Small) R3.08.10 to R3.09.50, CENTUM VP (includes CENTUM VP Small, Basic) R4.01.00 to R6.07.00, B/M9000CS R5.04.01 to R5.05.01, and B/M9000 VP R6.01.01 to R8.03.01 allows a remote unauthenticated attacker to bypass authentication and send altered c...
CVE-2020-5609
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-05
Directory traversal vulnerability in CAMS for HIS CENTUM CS 3000 (includes CENTUM CS 3000 Small) R3.08.10 to R3.09.50, CENTUM VP (includes CENTUM VP Small, Basic) R4.01.00 to R6.07.00, B/M9000CS R5.04.01 to R5.05.01, and B/M9000 VP R6.01.01 to R8.03.01 allows a remote unauthenticated attacker to cre...
CVE-2020-8607
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-05
An input validation vulnerability found in multiple Trend Micro products utilizing a particular version of a specific rootkit protection driver could allow an attacker in user-mode with administrator permissions to abuse the driver to modify a kernel address that may cause a system crash or potentia...