Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Attacks/Breaches

AntiSec Hacks NY, California Law Enforcement

Breaches show database insecurity is still the norm, despite rash of attacks by hacktivists.

News of an AntiSec hack of law enforcement associations on both coasts earlier this week showed that while it might be a new year, we can pretty much expect lots of the same with respect to database security in 2012. The same insecure configurations. The same cleartext storage of passwords and sensitive information in unprotected databases. The same abysmal access control and password management practices. And, of course, the same embarrassing attacks that, maybe by the year 3012, will spur organizations to make some changes in the way they approach the basics of database security.

"We're just not learning from the successful attacks that keep happening," said Josh Shaul, CTO of Application Security. "It's astounding. It seems like almost anywhere Anonymous aims their targets to go out and penetrate, they're able to break in without any difficulty. It just makes me wonder what happens when people who want to do this for criminal purposes--more than hacktivist reasons, but to actually steal from organizations--if it is just as easy for them?"

This time around, AntiSec went after the email systems for New York State police chiefs and the website for the California Statewide Law Enforcement Association (CSLEA). The hacktivist group publicly dumped loads of stolen database information from both attacks on New Year's Eve.

In the former case, the group dumped a password file with MD5 hashed passwords and residential addresses for more than 300 police chiefs in New York, plus personal information and residential addresses for more than 1,000 more law enforcement personnel. In the latter case, AntiSec completely shut down and defaced CSLEA's website, putting up a snarky missive about its conquest on the site and dumping all of the information stored in its membership roster of 2,500 members, including passwords and credit card numbers stored in cleartext.

In its message, the group said that even as CSLEA administrators sniffed evidence of the breach and made changes to shut down the attacks, it was too little too late.

Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

In this new Tech Center report, we profile five database breaches--and extract the lessons to be learned from each. Plus: A rundown of six technologies to reduce your risk. Download it here (registration required).

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 7/6/2020
Introducing 'Secure Access Service Edge'
Rik Turner, Principal Analyst, Infrastructure Solutions, Omdia,  7/3/2020
Russian Cyber Gang 'Cosmic Lynx' Focuses on Email Fraud
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  7/7/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
The Threat from the Internetand What Your Organization Can Do About It
This report describes some of the latest attacks and threats emanating from the Internet, as well as advice and tips on how your organization can mitigate those threats before they affect your business. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-5604
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-09
Android App 'Mercari' (Japan version) prior to version 3.52.0 allows arbitrary method execution of a Java object by a remoto attacker via a Man-In-The-Middle attack by using Java Reflection API of JavaScript code on WebView.
CVE-2020-5974
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-08
NVIDIA JetPack SDK, version 4.2 and 4.3, contains a vulnerability in its installation scripts in which permissions are incorrectly set on certain directories, which can lead to escalation of privileges.
CVE-2020-15072
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-08
An issue was discovered in phpList through 3.5.4. An error-based SQL Injection vulnerability exists via the Import Administrators section.
CVE-2020-15073
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-08
An issue was discovered in phpList through 3.5.4. An XSS vulnerability occurs within the Import Administrators section via upload of an edited text document. This also affects the Subscriber Lists section.
CVE-2020-2034
PUBLISHED: 2020-07-08
An OS Command Injection vulnerability in the PAN-OS GlobalProtect portal allows an unauthenticated network based attacker to execute arbitrary OS commands with root privileges. An attacker requires some knowledge of the firewall to exploit this issue. This issue can not be exploited if GlobalProtect...